Blogs and News from Partners

Vacancy: HGV Driver / Handyperson (closing date 17 December)

Marine Scotland Blog - Tue, 2018-11-20 10:00

We are currently seeking applications for a Driver / Handyperson at Marine Scotland (MS) Marine Laboratory, based in Aberdeen. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The post is part of the Ships and Logistics Group, which supports the work of MS’s scientific programme. The post will provide logistical support during loading and unloading of MS ships, including HGV driving, transit van, on-site forklift operations and cover for MS Deliveries / Stores.

Qualifications Required
For jobs in Bands A, you must hold a minimum of 5 Standard Grades (grades 1-3) or Ordinary Grades (grades A-C) including English and a numerical subject.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact the Resourcing Officer named at the end of this advert to discuss.

Essential Criteria

  1. UK driving licence including categories B, categories C + E (HGV).
  2. Good interpersonal, networking and team working skills.
  3. The ability to organise and prioritise workload.
  4. To be willing and able to attain a licence in driving licence categories BE and D1 and undertake CPC, forklift driving and banksman training.

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Frances Mackay who can be reached at Frances Mackay or 01312442500.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the resourcing team on 01312445597 or via recruitment@gov.scot.

Further information for this job

 

The post Vacancy: HGV Driver / Handyperson (closing date 17 December) appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Researching Blue Carbon – meet Hannah Lee

Marine Scotland Blog - Fri, 2018-11-16 10:00

A new Scottish Government funded research programme into Blue Carbon began earlier this year as part of a commitment in the 2017-2018 Programme for Government.  The current focus revolves around measuring the ability of various habitats to sequester carbon, understanding how it is stored for the long term, and building an evidence base on the effects that human activities may have on these process.  To support the programme, the Scottish Government has sponsored a number of PhD students and Marine Scotland has just established the Scottish Blue Carbon Forum (SBCF), which will be made up of the students and supervisors of the studies, as well as external stakeholders and Scottish Government climate change colleagues.

In this series of seven blogs, we will be introducing you to each of the seven students and letting them tell you more about their work.

Next up, Hannah Lee.

Hannah Lee

My name is Hannah Lee, I have a background in Marine Biology and Zoology, having loved all things ocean since a very young age! The focus of my PhD, is looking at ecosystems service provision by shellfish, specifically bivalves, in terms of water quality management and the function of shellfish beds as blue carbon stores, otherwise known as: Blue carbon of shellfish beds – Unlocking the vaults of biogenic reefs.

To understand the function of a shellfish bed as a blue carbon store I am working to identify the ‘jigsaw pieces’ that recycle carbon within a bed. These components can be broken down into biodeposition (waste material production), respiration (energy and CO2 production) and calcification (the growth of the animal’s shell). By developing our understanding of the real-time rates of the for mentioned we can begin to understand how beds capture, release or store carbon. In addition to this, I will also be surveying shellfish beds to estimate the amount of carbon currently stored, by comparing this to our real-time measurements I will try to understand how shellfish carbon stores change over time.

Having been in post for 6 months, I am currently in the process of building a strong background to my work, planning my studies and conducting pilot experiments to better understand the methods I plan to use. As a PhD student working with the Dornoch Environmental Enhancement Project (DEEP), I have also been conducting reconnaissance diving trips in the Dornoch Firth to understand the working conditions of the dive sites.

A primary aim of my research is to consider the ‘shellfish carbon jigsaw’ at a seasonal scale, running experiments every few months. My research will be conducted through experiments both in the field (by diver deployment in the Dornoch Firth), and in the lab (at St Abbs Marine Station). ‘Biodeposition units’ (pictured) will be deployed into the Dornoch Firth to look at real-time biodeposition rates, this can then be compared to the carbon we observe stored in a known bed. In the near future, I will also be deploying an experiment to look at growth and calcification of the native oyster and the blue mussel under different flow conditions in the Dornoch Firth. This will involve a range of techniques from carbon processing and photography to setting shells in resin and sectioning them to look at internal growth bands to estimate growth rates, to understand the relationship between growth and release of CO2 over the deployment period.

Meanwhile, facilities at the St Abbs Marine Station will be utilised on a seasonal basis to capture the variation in the three components of the jigsaw across the year. Looking at calcification, respiration and biodeposition rates using natural water from St Abbs Bay, under realistic flow settings. Improving our understanding of bivalve beds as blue carbon stores allows us to calculate a worth of such ecosystems when considering restoration and management.

Hannah Lee

Further Information

The post Researching Blue Carbon – meet Hannah Lee appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Sampling in the Strata

Marine Scotland Blog - Wed, 2018-11-14 14:39

Survey: 1718S MRV Scotia Programme

Duration: 12 November – 4 December 2018

Fishing Gear: GOV (Grand Overture Verticale) Trawl (BT137) and ground gear D (hoppers).

Objectives:
  1. Participate in the ICES co-ordinated western division demersal trawling survey.
  2. Obtain temperature and salinity data profiles at each trawling position.
  3. Collect additional biological data in connection with the EU Data Collection Framework (DCF).
  4. Retrieval of Compass moorings deployed during previous survey.
Procedures:

MRV Scotia set sail on 12 November to commence fishing operations on stations to the west of the Orkneys.  Survey schedule and operations will be decided by the Scientist-in-Charge (SiC) after daily consultation with the Fishing Master and the Captain.  A half-landing with be made around 24 November, to exchange staff, but the date and port will be confirmed once operations are fully underway.

Trawling:

This is a random-stratified survey design with trawl stations distributed within twelve predefined strata covering the sampling area (Figure 1). A more detailed map showing the Clyde trawl stations, in relation to the underwater cable installed in 2017, is provided in Figure 2. A total of 60 primary and 38 secondary stations have been generated. 60 trawls will be undertaken on suitable ground as near to the primary sampling positions (Table 1) as is practicable, and where possible within a radius of five nautical miles (nm) of the sampling position.

In the event that trawling is not possible within 5 nm of any primary station then the nearest appropriate secondary station will be used. Hauls will be of 30 minutes duration unless circumstances dictate otherwise. Where possible, fishing operations will be restricted to daylight hours. Exact start and finish times will vary slightly according to geographical location.

The Scanmar system will be used to monitor the headline height, wing spread and door spread for each haul. Bottom contact data from each trawl will also be collected using the NOAA bottom contact sensor, which will be mounted on a bar in the middle of the ground-gear. In addition to the routine sampling, biological data will be collected for target species in line with the EU data regulation.

Fish Sampling:

All fish will be processed in accordance with the protocols as described in the Manual of the IBTS North Eastern Atlantic Surveys. Series of ICES Survey Protocols SISP 15. 92 pp.

Hydrography Sampling:

Conductivity Temperature Depth (CTD) casts will be taken at each trawl station, weather permitting.

Compass Moorings:

During the survey two days will be allocated to the retrieval of six acoustic moorings deployed during previous surveys. An acoustic release system will be deployed from the vessels side deck to trigger each mooring. A map displaying the mooring locations, together with their positions, is provided in Figure 3.

Further Information and Maps: Figure 1 (below): Trawl Locations for Survey 1718S 

Note – tow positions for each core station (solid circle) and alternative/additional positions (empty circles) will be added as time allows.

Figure 1 1718S trawl locations

Figure 2 (below): Detailed Map showing Clyde Stations (in relation to cable installed in 2017).

Note – The blue line shows the location of the deep-water cable installed in 2017 and the red dotted line shows the ± 1.5 nmi safety area around the cable.

1718S Figure 2 Detailed map showing Clyde stations in relation to cable installed in 2017

Figure 3 (below): Location and Position of Compass Moorings 1718S Figure 3 Location and position of Compass moorings Table 1 (below): Position of Primary Sampling Stations for Survey 1718S

Table 1 1718S – Position of primary sampling stations

 

The post Sampling in the Strata appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Assistant Marine Chemist, Aberdeen, closing date 5th December

Marine Scotland Blog - Mon, 2018-11-12 11:35

We are currently seeking applications for an Assistant Marine Chemist within the Environment Monitoring and Assessment programme based in Aberdeen. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The role of this post is to undertake trace metal analyses of sediment and biota in support of Marine Scotland priority work areas such as marine renewable energy, marine licensing, and environmental assessments for the Marine Strategy Framework Directive and OSPAR.  In addition the post holder will provide support to the microplastic monitoring and research, contributing to the processing of environmental samples for the separation and identification of microplastics.

Qualifications Required:

For jobs in Band A, you must hold a minimum of 5 Standard Grades (grades 1 – 3) or Ordinary Grades (A-C) including English and a numerical subject.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

Essential Criteria:
  1. Basic laboratory skills.
  2. Organisational skills, have the ability to plan and organise work to meet agreed deadlines.
  3. An ability to follow written and verbal instructions and work accurately.
  4. Knowledge and understanding of use of Word, Excel.

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Dr Lynda Webster who can be reached at Lynda.Webster@gov.scot or 0131 244 3798

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the Resourcing Team on 0131 244 7397 or via recruitment@gov.scot.

Further information for this job:

Assistant Marine Chemist Person Specification

The post Vacancy: Assistant Marine Chemist, Aberdeen, closing date 5th December appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Researching Blue Carbon – meet Allan Audsley

Marine Scotland Blog - Fri, 2018-11-09 10:00

A new Scottish Government funded research programme into Blue Carbon began earlier this year as part of a commitment in the 2017-2018 Programme for Government.  The current focus revolves around measuring the ability of various habitats to sequester carbon, understanding how it is stored for the long term, and building an evidence base on the effects that human activities may have on these process.  To support the programme, the Scottish Government has sponsored a number of PhD students and Marine Scotland has just established the Scottish Blue Carbon Forum (SBCF), which will be made up of the students and supervisors of the studies, as well as external stakeholders and Scottish Government climate change colleagues.

In this series of seven blogs, we will be introducing you to each of the seven students and letting them tell you more about their work.

Next up, Allan Audsley.

Allan Audsley

My PhD project, funded by the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology Scotland (MASTS) and Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), is jointly supervised by Dr Tom Bradwell (Stirling), Dr John Howe (SAMS) and Prof. John Baxter (SNH). Pockmarks are formed due to mobile fluids within the sediment rising and entering the water column. Within this fluid, gases such as methane and carbon dioxide can be dissolved or exist as free gas bubbles. This gas was formed through microbial activity breaking down the organic matter that was deposited over thousands of years; this is referred to as ‘blue carbon’. Pockmarks represent an important marker for sites of blue carbon and act as gateways for it to re-enter the carbon cycle. However, the spatial distribution and activity status of pockmarks in Scottish waters is currently unknown. My PhD project aims to determine the morphological characteristics of pockmarks within fjordic settings around Scotland’s west coast in order to determine pockmark significance towards the carbon budget.

Hundreds of these pockmarks have been observed within sea lochs across western Scotland, many of which are over a hundred metres in diameter and up to seventeen metres deep. Pockmarks can be found either forming in long linear strings or in what appears to be random scatterings. Due to this wide variety in shape, size and distribution patterns it is essential to research how they are classified. The shape and size are a result of pockmark activity and the environment they have formed in. By investigating these factors we can begin to shed light on the formation of these features.

Seismic surveys carried out across Scottish inshore waters can allow us to study the sedimentological structure of the seabed. It is within these records that we can also observe gas, which has a variety of acoustic signatures. It has been shown that the variety of these signatures can show differences in how the gas is distributed in the sediment. Research into the distribution of gas rich sediment and the geological history of the region will help to not only quantify the free gas present within Scottish waters but to also build a picture of the formation mechanisms and history of pockmark activity.

Scotland’s fjords and sea lochs represent very important sites of sub-seafloor shallow gas and mobile fluids. The seafloor around Western Scotland has been shown to be a significant reservoir for stored ‘blue carbon’. Pockmarks are the clearest seafloor expression of geologically recent fluid escape from the subsurface to the ocean. This research will go towards furthering our understanding of the Scottish/ global carbon cycles. Other stakeholders also have an interest in this research: especially regarding the designation of marine protected areas; the siting of offshore infrastructure; and the biodiversity of benthic fauna.

Allan Audsley

Further Information

The post Researching Blue Carbon – meet Allan Audsley appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Celebrating the Year of the Engineer with a closer look at our ships

Marine Scotland Blog - Tue, 2018-11-06 10:00

As we mentioned in our blog in January, 2018 is the Year of the Engineer as well as the Year of the Young Person. Over the course of the year, we’ve been introducing you to some of our incredibly talented engineers, as well as showing your some of their work.

This month, as the penultimate blog, we’re doing something a bit different and taking you through a bit of a photo album to share some proper heavy engineering metal with you. But just before we get started, for those of you in the Edinburgh area, we’ve got an exhibition running until January at the Scottish Seabird Centre in North Berwick, which showcases our Marine Protection Vessels. There are photographs, videos, uniforms, a model ship and instructions of how to build your own Lego fleet.

But let’s be clear – being a ship engineer involves more than Lego. It involves knowing your way around this kind of thing – a propeller shaft and hub:

Propellor shaft and hub

But what else do our marine engineer have to look after? To give you an idea, here are some pictures taken during one of our refits. Just like you MOT a car, we have to do the same with our ships, called a refit. Every 2 years our ships are taken in to dry dock where the hulls are washed and painted, propellers polished, and general under water hull condition inspected.

Survey and maintenance of larger components such as the gear box, propulsion motors, diesel generators, alternators, bow and stern thrusters, auxiliary pumps and electrical switch gear is also carried out during this time to ensure they are, literally, ship shape and safe to be at sea.

Our engineers play a key role during re-fit because of their expertise and knowledge of the ships workings, as well as their range of skills. Without engineers, our ships wouldn’t run, so they need to know their way around things like the ship’s hull:

Paint stripping the hull

In the photo above the ships old paint system was completely removed to allow a new slick paint system to be applied. The new paint is designed to last considerably longer than the old system and reduce fuel consumption.

Main Diesel Engines Wartsila20 1600KW

Wartsilla diesel engine

Ships engineers carry out the routine servicing of the generator engines at sea but major engine overhauls and class surveys are carried out every 5 years whilst in refit. Ships engineers supervise and assist the engine manufacturers service engineers during the work.

Maintenance undertaken includes cylinder head overhaul, fuel injection pump overhaul, piston and liner cleaning and inspection, turbocharger overhaul, bottom end and main bearing inspection, camshaft inspection, auxiliary water, fuel and lube oil pump overhauls, inspection of all cooling water passages, TV damper inspection and calibration of all parts to ensure the engine is fit to run for another 5 years.

Switchboards

Switchboard

Engineers carry out routine maintenance and inspection work on the ships 660V, 415V, 240V and 24VDC transformers, switchboards and switch gear.

When in refit the vessel is powered from a shore supply so the ships systems can be shut down and isolated, which is much safer and easier to do than when the vessel is afloat in service.

Work carried out – which is a mix of planned maintenance and 5 yearly survey work – includes checking terminal tightness and bus bar connections, inspection of cabling for overheating, checking cable insulation resistance,  inspection and cleaning of the transformers and switchboard cubicles. Engineers also supervise shore contractors who service and test the main circuit breakers and  control systems.

Chief Engineers are qualified to work on high voltage systems, which is any voltage over 1000V. Yikes!

Propulsion motors and gearboxes

Propulsion motors and gearboxes

As we mentioned above, a mix of routine planned maintenance and survey work is carried out when the ships systems are shut down.

Jobs include laser alignment checks of the main propulsion motor couplings, internal inspection of the gearbox to check the condition and wear patterns on the teeth, visual inspection of the structure, inspection of clutches and bearings. The propulsion motors are inspected internally, sometimes using an endoscope,  to ensure the stator and armature are in good condition. Electrical tests are carried out to check the wiring insulation. Motor bearings are changed when required.

The engineers in the photo above can be seen removing the flexible coupling element between the propulsion motor and the gear box input shaft prior to removing the motor output shaft coupling to allow motor bearing replacement.

Routine propulsion motor bearing replacement

Routine propulsion motor bearing replacement

In the photograph above ships engineers can be seen assisting the shore contractor during the routine propulsion motor bearing replacement.

Due to the compactness of the motor room, the motor had to be raised to ensure the output shaft was clear of the gearbox input shaft to allow the coupling hub to be removed. Once the hub was removed the motor end shields were unbolted and removed to allow access to the bearings.

What you can’t see here is that it took the engineers 4 days to prepare the surrounding area prior to the contractor arriving to carry out the motor maintenance. Walkways around the gearbox and motors had to be removed, along with the deck head panels, ventilation trunking and associated pipe work which was in the way. Additional lifting points also had to be welded in place above the motor.

Main genset cylinder heads

Main genset cylinder heads

Large parts such as the main genset cylinder heads are very heavy.

The ship is fitted with a telescopic hi-ab crane which can reach into the engine room via a large hatch to lift out heavy items when required.

TIG welding

TIG welding

Ships engineers not only have to be competent in mechanical and electrical overhauls of the ships machinery, they also are trained in welding (TIG, MIG, Arc and brazing), fitting and turning. The ships are fitted with a well-equipped workshop with machinery such as a milling machine and lathe. A vast array of power and hand tools are also neatly stored in the workshop. As the vessel can operate 250 miles out in the North Sea, engineers can usually make or repair parts in an emergency to get the vessel back to port where permanent repairs can be carried out.

It does means working at sea for three weeks at a time, but you must admit. It does look like fun!

Further Information

The post Celebrating the Year of the Engineer with a closer look at our ships appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Researching Blue Carbon – meet Corallie Hunt

Marine Scotland Blog - Fri, 2018-11-02 14:00

A new Scottish Government funded research programme into Blue Carbon began earlier this year as part of a commitment in the 2017-2018 Programme for Government.  The current focus revolves around measuring the ability of various habitats to sequester carbon, understanding how it is stored for the long term, and building an evidence base on the effects that human activities may have on these process.  To support the programme, the Scottish Government has sponsored a number of PhD students and Marine Scotland has just established the Scottish Blue Carbon Forum (SBCF), which will be made up of the students and supervisors of the studies, as well as external stakeholders and Scottish Government climate change colleagues.

In this series of seven blogs, we will be introducing you to each of the seven students and letting them tell you more about their work.

First up, Corallie Hunt.

A National Inventory of Sedimentary Blue Carbon on the Scottish Continental Shelf

Loch Creran

Figure 1: Loch Creran, Argyll, Scotland

The marine environment plays a key role in the global carbon cycle.

The oceans contain approximately 50 times more carbon than the atmosphere and are the largest carbon sink on Earth.

Recent studies have highlighted so-called ‘blue carbon’ ecosystems, coastal, vegetated habitats, as having a valuable role in sequestration and storage of atmospheric CO2.

Additionally, marine sediments are considered as long-term stores of carbon. Although, sediments do not actively draw-down CO2 from the atmosphere in the same way, if undisturbed they can store carbon-rich matter that has settled out of the water column for millennia.

A recent SNH-commissioned report brought to life the wealth of Scotland’s blue carbon resources in coastal habitats and offshore waters. It recommended that further research be undertaken to improve our understanding of the role of sedimentary carbon within the global carbon cycle.

My PhD research focuses on the sedimentary carbon store on the Scottish Continental Shelf (SCS). Covering an estimated area of 470,000 km2 the SCS has a very diverse seabed, which has been heavily influenced by past glacial conditions.

Acoustic backscatter data using a multi-beam echosounder from Loch Creran highlighting the variability in sediment type

Acoustic backscatter data using a multi-beam echosounder from Loch Creran highlighting the variability in sediment type

Spatial mapping will play an integral component to understanding where organic carbon is likely to be found and to create a first-order estimation of the carbon stock.

I am currently focussing on Loch Creran, a sea-loch, or fjord, on the west coast of Scotland (Figure 1, above). Fjords are natural sinks of marine and terrestrial carbon due to their proximity to land and geomorphology, trapping settling sediments in over-deepened glacial basins.

A recent acoustic survey shows the surficial sediments to be heterogeneous which implies that not all sediments in Loch Creran are equal.

I am developing a methodology using acoustic backscatter (‘sound’), sea-bed imagery (‘sight’) and optimised grab sampling (‘touch’) to determine the effectiveness of using acoustics to predict carbon storage within surficial sediments.

Due to the relationship between sediment-type and sound-reflection, multi-beam acoustic systems are used to characterise the seabed. Carbon storage is related to sediment grain size; fine-grained sediments generally have higher contents of organic matter. Using these relationships, I am trying to determine whether a correlation between acoustic data and organic carbon content exists.

The outcomes of this project should improve our ability to predict and spatially map the surface sedimentary carbon store in Loch Creran, which may be used to inform carbon vulnerability studies and marine management planning. If successful, this method could be applied to improving spatial mapping in similar environments or potentially upscaled to cover larger areas, for instance on the Continental Shelf.

Corallie Hunt

Further Information

The post Researching Blue Carbon – meet Corallie Hunt appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Fishing Gear and Flying Kites

Marine Scotland Blog - Thu, 2018-11-01 12:37

Survey: 1618S MRV Scotia Programme

Duration: 28 October – 08 November 2018

Objectives:
  1. To carryout catch comparison trials to compare the fishing performance of the BT237 against the standard survey trawl BT137 GOV rigged with ‘A’ gear.
  2. To assess the fishing performance, in terms of gear geometry, of the new Vonin ‘Flyer’ kite as a replacement for the standard metal kite used with BT137.
Procedures: General

The fishing gear will be loaded aboard and rigged prior to the start of the survey. The BT137 with ground gear ‘A’ will be rigged on the top net drum and the BT237 trawl rigged on the lower net drum. The polyvalent doors will be used with both trawls throughout the survey, spare set stored on the upper castles. Scotia will sail on 28 October and make passage for the Moray Firth where shakedown hauls will be made with both trawls.

Thereafter, and weather permitting, the vessel will proceed north to fishing grounds East of the Orkneys or Shetland Islands.

Fishing

The main objective of the survey is to compare the fishing performance between BT137 and BT237 using the alternate haul method (Objective 1). Catch comparison hauls will consist of 15 minute to 30 minute tows depending on fish species mix on the grounds. The hauls will be paired (BT137 v BT237 or BT237 v BT137) and both paired hauls must run along the same fishing track. The aim to keep the pattern, timing and environmental factors (daylight/dark periods) as constant as possible between the first and second tow in each set of paired hauls.

During the survey gear geometry data and underwater observation using a self-recording camera will be made to assess the performance of the new ‘Flyer’ plastic kite attached to BT137 (Objective 2).

Fishing Gear:
  • BT137 GOV (Grand Overture Verticale) trawl rigged with ground gear ‘A’.
  • BT237 (Jackson trawl) rigged with light hopper rig (300mm and 250mm discs).
  • Two sets GOV polyvalent trawl doors.
  • Two Vonin ‘Flyer’ plastic kites.
Further Information:

The post Fishing Gear and Flying Kites appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy – Senior Aquatic Epidemiological Modeller (closing date 20 November)

Marine Scotland Blog - Mon, 2018-10-29 10:00

We are currently seeking applications for a Senior Aquatic Epidemiological modeller within the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries based in Aberdeen. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

Marine Scotland requires a modeller to provide insights required to develop effective controls on disease and parasites of fish and shellfish.  Particular concerns are with sea lice and gill diseases of marine farmed salmon, but priorities change as problems are solved or new diseases emerge.  Modelling dispersal processes over areas is a particular focus of our research to support healthy salmon.

Qualifications Required
For jobs in Band B & C you must hold a minimum of 3 Highers or equivalent.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

Essential Criteria
1. An excellent background in biological, veterinary, and/or epidemiological principles to higher degree level, or equivalent experience and a good experience of using numerical (mathematics, statistics, modelling) methods).
2. An excellent understanding of the principles of modelling and flexibility to learn new techniques.
3. Evidence of effective oral and written communication skills, with the ability to communicate confidently within a team and to diverse audiences including policy and scientific audiences and readers.
4. Strong IT skills with an ability to programme (preferably in R) and a good working knowledge of Microsoft Office, particularly Word and Excel.

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Sandy Murray who can be reached at sandy.murray@gov.scot or 0131 244 4327.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the resourcing team on 0131 244 7719 or via recruitment@gov.scot.

Further information for this job

The post Vacancy – Senior Aquatic Epidemiological Modeller (closing date 20 November) appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy – Marine Ornithologist (closing date 20 November)

Marine Scotland Blog - Fri, 2018-10-26 10:00

We are currently seeking applications for a Marine Ornithologist within Marine Scotland Science based in Aberdeen. This is fixed term appointment and pensionable appointment until 31st March 2022 and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

You will work within the INTERREG VA funded MarPAMM project focussing on delivery of the work package titled “Seabird Monitoring”. This will deliver seabird population viability analyses and pressure mapping, and expert input into: development of the seabird census; monitoring and tracking tender specifications; provision of access to Vessel Management System (VMS) data to project partners; writing of technical and non-technical reports; dissemination of project methods and findings to relevant industry, policy and technical stakeholders; and participation in contract steering groups. The post holder will be required to work collaboratively with other institutions, requiring a strong outward focus, excellent communication skills, travel within the UK and overseas, and an ability to work well with a range of different colleagues.

Qualifications Required
You will be expected to hold a relevant university degree. Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact the Resourcing Officer named at the end of this advert to discuss.

Essential Criteria
1. A good understanding of seabird biology including undertaking seabird monitoring or tracking fieldwork.
2. Demonstrable data analysis and statistical skills, including use of specialist statistical software, such as R.
3. The ability to work independently with good organisational skills and effectively manage projects.
4. Excellent written and oral communication skills, with the ability to explain scientific concepts to varied audiences.

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Finlay Bennet who can be reached at finlay.bennet@gov.scot or 0131 244 2647.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact Angela McLachlan on 0131 244 4682 or angela.mclachlan@gov.scot.

Further information 

The post Vacancy – Marine Ornithologist (closing date 20 November) appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancies – Marine Licensing Casework Manager and Officer (closing date 19 November 2018)

Marine Scotland Blog - Wed, 2018-10-24 17:02

We are currently seeking applications for a Marine Licensing Casework Manager  and Marine Licensing Casework Officer within the Marine Scotland – Licensing Operations Team based in Aberdeen. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

Marine Licensing Casework Manager 

The job holder will co-ordinate the application process for marine licences (under the Marine (Scotland) Act 2010, part 4 – Marine Licensing) and S36 consents (under the Electricity Act 1989), providing advice to applicants, liaising with statutory and non-statutory consultees and issuing appropriately conditioned marine licences.

Qualifications Required
For jobs in Band B & C you must hold a minimum of 3 Highers or equivalent.
Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.
Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

Read more…..

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Marine Licensing Casework Officer

The job holder will co-ordinate the application process for marine licences (under the Marine (Scotland) Act 2010, part 4 – Marine Licensing) and S36 consents (under the Electricity Act 1989), providing advice to applicants, liaising with statutory and non-statutory consultees and issuing appropriately conditioned marine licences.

Qualifications Required
For jobs in Band B & C you must hold a minimum of 3 Highers or equivalent.
Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

Read more….

The post Vacancies – Marine Licensing Casework Manager and Officer (closing date 19 November 2018) appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Oil and Gas Pipeline Survey

Marine Scotland Blog - Tue, 2018-10-23 10:00

Survey: MRV Scotia 1518S

Duration: 18 –  24 October 2018

 

Equipment: Day grabs; TV drop frame with lasers; armoured cable; SVP; swathe multibeam echosounder system; EK 60; CTD; VMADCP and time lapse cameras.

 

Objectives:

  1. To assess the hydrographic influences on the aggregation of fish around surface laid oil and gas pipelines.
  1. To assess the handling and performance of a benthic time lapse camera.

 

Procedure:

MRV Scotia will depart from Aberdeen Harbour at 08:00 on 18 October and after all drills have been performed the vessel will proceed to the agreed survey start point.  The nature of the survey work will be heavily dependent on the prevailing weather conditions encountered.  The survey techniques are no different to previous surveys conducted by MSS using MRV Scotia.  The proposed survey is based on two parts:

 

  • The deployment and recovery of time lapse camera for the duration of the survey; and
  • The collection of fisheries acoustic data over 24 hour periods from a pipeline station.

 

Time Lapse Camera: The time lapse cameras will be placed on the seabed at the beginning of the survey at Station 9.  On completion of the survey, the cameras will be recovered on board the vessel.

 

EK60, CTD and VM-ADCP: The collection of fisheries acoustic data will involve two parallel transects 1 to 2 km in length running perpendicular to a pipeline (Figure 1).  Survey speeds during when collecting EK60 and VM-ADCP data will be 8 knots and 4 knots respectively.  Each survey will be conducted on different days.

 

During the collection of VM-ADCP data, CTD measurements will be made every 4 hours at the ends and centre point of a transect.  Water samples will also be collected to enable the calibration of the fluorescence detector on the CTD.  While transiting between CTD stations the EK60 will be switched off and the VM-ADCP used to collect water column current data.  The pipelines of interest are annotated in Figure 1.

 

Multibeam and Seabed Video footage: A sound velocity profile (SVP) will be collected 500 m outside of the survey location.  On completion of the SVP, MRV Scotia will complete a multibeam swathe along the length of the targeted pipeline. Survey speed will be 4 knots.  The output will be checked for any anomalous features that could interact with other survey equipment.  If features are identified MRV Scotia will relocate in the immediate area and repeat the multibeam swathe along the pipeline until a suitable length of pipeline is identified.

 

The multibeam data will be assessed to identify changes in the seabed substrate.  The substrates will be ground-truthed using a drop-frame camera.  The drop-frame will be deployed 500 m from the pipeline off the stern of the vessel using an armoured cable.  The drop-frame will be kept at 1.5 m above the seabed/pipeline and towed using the vessel’s bow thrusters at a speed of 1 knot or less (0.5 m per second) on a course perpendicular to the pipeline.  Video capability on the drop-frame will be forward looking and vertically mounted. It will also have a transponder enabling its position to be monitored and recorded.  The maximum time spent transecting the pipeline will be less than 5 seconds.

 

Multibeam transects will be run parallel and perpendicular to the pipeline to collect backscatter water column data for assessing the dimensions of fish aggregations.

On completion of the survey work, MRV Scotia will return to Aberdeen Harbour for unloading on 24 October.

 

Figure 1 showing a schematic diagram of the survey design for collecting fisheries acoustic data, VM-ADCP data and CTD data over a 24 hour period.

Figure 2 shows the stations 4 and 9 that will be surveyed during survey 1518S

Further Information:

 

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