Blogs and News from Partners

Celebrating Science and Year of the Young Person with Eric Dalgarno

Marine Scotland Blog - 9 hours 25 min ago

As we mentioned in one of our earlier blogs, 2018 is both the Year of the Engineer and the Year of the Young Person – and this blog is about one of our many colleagues who are inspiring the next generation with their Outreach work.

This is Eric, one of our Marine Environmental Chemists in our Marine Environmental Assessment Group. Read on to find out what he gets up to.

Who are you and what do you do?
My name is Eric Dalgarno and I do all the environmental monitoring work as part of the Environment, Monitoring and Assessment Group at the Marine Laboratory. Part of my work involves going on two sea trips a year. One in January to monitor the environmental state of the seas which involves fishing, sediments and water sampling which are then analysed for PHs, PPDEs, CBs and seawater nutrients. Then in September we have the deep water sampling trip. Both these trips involve going round the whole coastline and I prefer the September trip not just because of the weather but because of some of the strange things that we find.

Why is what you do important?
We keep a record of all these results every year to see what the changes in the sea are. We have kept records for quite a lot of years now so gives us a good indication of the pollutant levels. All the results are put into merman which is part of the Marine Atlas. One of the big things that we are currently doing is the microplastics which is all the small bits of plastic breaking down and for example microbeads from facial washes. This work involves monitoring the litter to find out how much is there and what is the predominant make up of it? Things overall are improving partly due to being able to find more of this type of pollution and also the outreach programmes which let people know what is out there and the effect it is having on the environment.

What’s your career path been – how did you get here?
I started working at the MAFF Torry Research Station (TRS) in June 1978 which is now the new SEPA building in Torry. In 1996 I then moved over to the Marine Laboratory across the road once the TRS moved down to York. My job has changed over the years from working with fish factories, experiments on fish during and after smoking in kilns, fish more as food at TRS to now at the Marine Laboratory more chemistry and environmental work on fish. So more than just a swap from the English Civil Service into the Scottish Civil Service. But overall been a Civil Servant for almost 40 years!

If you weren’t doing this, what do you think you’d be doing instead?
My family was from a farming background but never really fancy doing this. At school I enjoyed chemistry and biology so always wanted to work in a laboratory environment. In 1978 the oil industry in Aberdeen was only just really starting so might of looked for a job with one of the oil companies but very happy to have started working at TRS. Have always enjoyed lab based work.

What’s your favourite fishy fact?
The fascinating fish that is found on the deep water September trip. With samples coming from over 2,000 metres below the surface where no light is, the variety of sponges and corals and occasionally unknown species. Many of the species have poisons on them or in them or even teeth so you have to be very careful when handling them.

And what about one fun fact about you?
Not really a fun fact but something I enjoy doing is to continue to embarrass my daughters even when they are in their twenties. I am also still a member of the Taste Panel after very many years of tasting and a final fact which is fun … I also really enjoy whisky… a lot! Finally a close colleague did comment on his driving being but not much fun!

What do you enjoy most doing Outreach?
Working with young people and encouraging them into science is so very rewarding.

Further Information

The post Celebrating Science and Year of the Young Person with Eric Dalgarno appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Not all rivers are the same: new analysis reveals how juvenile salmon numbers vary across Scotland

Marine Scotland Blog - Wed, 2018-09-19 10:00

Electrofishing is a commonly used method for capturing, counting and sampling fish populations. Where electrofishing is performed according to carefully defined standards, and combined with appropriate statistical analysis, it is possible to estimate the number of fish in a particular section of a river. Electrofishing data have been collected across much of Scotland for over twenty years, however, they are often hard to interpret without a benchmark to compare against. A benchmark indicates how many fish are expected in a river, assuming that the environment and fish populations are healthy and by comparing the observed fish numbers against a benchmark it is possible to determine whether rivers are producing approximately the number of fish that are expected, more or less. Benchmarks are difficult to produce because rivers with different environmental characteristics support variable numbers of fish.

Over the last four years scientists from Marine Scotland’s Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory have collated and analysed data that they have collected along with Fisheries trusts, District Salmon Fishery Boards, SEPA and SNH to develop a National Juvenile Salmon Density Model for Scotland. The model uses information on the landscape characteristics of rivers (e.g. altitude, catchment area) to understand and predict how salmon densities vary between rivers, regions and years thereby providing a benchmark that could be used to assess salmon populations against (Figure 1). The model was underpinned by electrofishing data from 25 organisations, collected during 3848 visits to 1861 sites in 179 catchments over 19 years. New spatial data analysis approaches were developed to characterise habitat across Scotland (using landscape characteristics) and advanced statistical approaches were used to harmonise the dataset to account for differences in fish capture probability between organisations, habitats, regions and years. The resulting benchmark predictions for Atlantic salmon fry (young fish in their year after hatching) are shown in Figure.1 below:

Benchmark densities

Figure 1 Benchmark densities (those expected if the river environment and salmon populations were healthy) for Atlantic salmon fry predicted from the National Juvenile Density Model for Scotland. Grey lines show rivers where it was not possible to predict fish densities due to a lack of electrofishing data (mainly big and deep rivers where fishing is not possible). Thicker lines show larger rivers. River lines based on digital spatial data licensed from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, © NERC (CEH).

In 2018 Marine Scotland developed the National Electrofishing Programme for Scotland (NEPS), a strategically designed statistical sample of 810 sites across Scotland, delivered locally by fisheries trusts and boards. Data collected as part of this programme will be compared against the new national benchmarks. A further report on this work will be provided by the end of March 2018 that explains overall progress and explores the potential for assessing the status of Atlantic salmon using electrofishing data.

Further Information

The post Not all rivers are the same: new analysis reveals how juvenile salmon numbers vary across Scotland appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Turning MUSE-ings in to action

Marine Scotland Blog - Tue, 2018-09-18 10:00

 

MUSES infographic

Increasing demands on ocean resources and the associated conflicts between competing ocean users has made it crucial for us to carefully consider how we use our seas. Over the last two years, the Multi-Use in European Seas (MUSES) Project, led by Marine Scotland, has been researching the concept and the real life practicalities of “multi-use” in the five European sea basins – Baltic Sea, North Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea and Eastern Atlantic. This represents a radical shift from the concept of exclusive resource rights to the inclusive sharing of resources by one or more users.

Drawing on a comprehensive evidence base including in-depth regional and case study analysis, complemented by active engagement with relevant stakeholders in each sea basin, MUSES has developed an Action Plan to help make the future multi-use development in European Seas a reality. The Action Plan suggests practical solutions for overcoming regulatory and other non-technical barriers (including finance, insurance and licencing procedures), as well as how to minimise risks associated with multi-use development.

The Action Plan itself will be presented at the MUSES final conference, which is being held in Brussels on October 10th. The conference will provide a platform for those with an interest in blue growth to consider possible solutions for advancing multi-use development in Europe, and will offer attendees an opportunity to learn more about multi-use opportunities in specific areas, such as offshore renewable energy in combination with different types of aquaculture, or tourism sector in combination with underwater cultural heritage or fisheries (pescatourism).

Further Information

MUSES logo

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Let’s Go Fly a Kite

Marine Scotland Blog - Mon, 2018-09-17 10:00

Survey: 1418A MRV Alba na Mara Programme

This survey will be executed in two parts during the window of 12th September to the 25th September 2018.

Part One Objectives:

  • Live fish capture for tank based trials in our Fish Behaviour Unit (FBU); and
  • Trialing new Vonin ‘Flyer’ headline kites.

Part Two Objectives:

  • Recover (VR2Tx) salmon detectors between Ythan Estuary and Findon Ness by Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV); and
  • Search for two missing moorings as time and tide allow. Last recorded positions for these are: 57° 07.751’ N : -1° 54.141W and 57° 03.271’: -2° 01.912’W.

Procedure for Part One:

Equipment will be loaded onto MRV Alba na Mara at Fraserburgh; where the trawl and wire rig will be rigged onto the net drum. Scientific staff will also join the Alba na Mara and rig the live fish codend on to Bottom Trawl type 158 (BT158). Once rigging is complete the vessel will sail to suitable grounds off Aberdeen and complete shakedown tows with the new BT158 to ensure the trawl fishes correctly.

Short hauls will then be made to trial the new Vonin headline kites and to assess available fish species on the grounds. For the remainder of the survey short five to ten minute hauls will be made to obtain live, healthy, fish for tank based behaviour trials. Fish will regularly be collected from the harbor, by aquarium staff, and transported back to the FBU.

Procedure for Part Two:

For the second part of the survey the vessel will depart Aberdeen and, weather dependant, proceed to recover the salmon detector moorings in the Aberdeen Bay array. The vessel will anchor at each location to allow ROV operations to be undertaken for locating and recovering the missing moorings.

Equipment:

  • BT 158 – New design with guard meshes.
  • Trawl doors, sweeps, bridles, backstrops and pennants.
  • Standard ground gear incorporating rockhopper centre section.
  • Live fish codends.
  • 2 x Vonin plastic ‘Flyers’ (net kites used to generate lift).
  • Moray Marine ROV.

Further Information:

The post Let’s Go Fly a Kite appeared first on Marine Scotland.

A Tall Ship Amongst the Nephrops

Marine Scotland Blog - Fri, 2018-09-14 10:00

Survey: 1318A MRV Alba na Mara

Duration: 25th August – 10th September 2018

Another busy week of TV deployments aboard Alba na Mara for the Nephrops Underwater TV (UWTV) Survey. This weeks efforts were concentrated in the Firth of Forth where we managed a total of 56 TV stations and two fishing operations. Poor visibility meant an additional five stations were undertaken.  This was down to a mix of tide, commercial fishing operations, and other marine traffic stirring up the sea bed. Plentiful burrows were viewed when the visibility allowed though.

Highlights of the week include a small number of Minke whales at the mouth of the Forth estuary. Several were seen over the course of the morning but unfortunately we didn’t manage to get any pictures.

Among the busy shipping channel towards Leith we were lucky enough to see a wide variety of ocean going craft; oil and chemical tankers, cruise ships, and a German registered tall ship the ‘Alexander Von Humboldt II’. One of our stations brought us close alongside whilst she was at anchor so we did manage to get a picture of her.

Further Information:

The post A Tall Ship Amongst the Nephrops appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Go west….to Greenland!

Marine Scotland Blog - Thu, 2018-09-13 10:00

We’re excited about bringing you this next blog. Sean, who you’ll read about below, is taking part in a West Greenland Salmon Sampling trip. But what is it and why is sampling done in Greenland? Read on to find out….Copyright of Sean Duggan

 Welcome to my West Greenland Salmon Sampling Photo Blog

My name is Sean Dugan and I am based at the Marine Scotland Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory near Pitlochry. I am employed by Fisheries Management Scotland (FMS) with joint funding from Marine Scotland (MS), Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) and the fisheries trusts and boards. My role involves providing support to local fisheries managers in Scotland; in terms of data collection, data storage, training and mapping services.

I am responsible for facilitating the sharing of data between fisheries trusts, MS, and SEPA. My role also involves working with MS to support fisheries management planning and salmon conservation regulations. MS fund expenses on the trip and my time is covered by a combination of annual leave and FMS.

I have been on the waiting list for this trip for four years and have finally arrived in Maniitsoq, West Greenland. I will keep you updated with photos and insights during my trip. You can keep up with my Greenland Flickr photostream here.

Wild Atlantic Salmon

Scotland’s wild Atlantic salmon fishery generates over £100 million per year for the rural economy. Populations across the North Atlantic have declined in recent years despite reductions in exploitation and many other freshwater conservation efforts. Atlantic salmon have an anadromous life cycle meaning that they migrate from salt water up rivers to spawn. After hatching juveniles usually spend between one and three years in freshwater before migrating to sea. Salmon feed across the North Atlantic and travel as far as West Greenland. After a year or more at sea salmon return to the river of their birth to continue their life cycle.

The likelihood of salmon surviving their marine migration has declined in recent decades to a situation where less than five out of every 100 salmon leaving the Scottish coast return safely. This decline has prompted international research efforts including the West Greenland Salmon Sampling Programme.

History of West Greenland Sampling

In the 1960’s and 1970’s the West Greenland salmon fishery involved vessels from numerous countries intercepting fish originating from North America, continental Europe, Iceland and Greenland. At the height of the Fishery in the early 1970’s up to 2700 tonnes of salmon were caught. Many of the salmon populations from the natal rivers have experienced large declines and some are now facing extinction. Scientists have sampled salmon in West Greenland since the 1960’s with an increased co-ordinated effort since 2002. Since then, Scottish Government have contributed to this sampling effort by funding a Scottish sampler each year.

Four regions in Greenland will be sampled in 2018 by samplers from several North Atlantic countries, co-ordinated by Tim Sheehan of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in Massachusetts.

WHY Sample?

Information collected is used by the International Council for the Exploration of the Seas’ (ICES) to provide catch advice to the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organisation (NASCO) including the composition of the mixed stock fishery and region of origin (see map below). NASCO is an international organisation, established by an inter-governmental Convention in 1984, to conserve, restore, enhance and rationally manage Atlantic salmon through international cooperation taking account of the best available scientific information. Sample data is also used to account for under-reporting of catches if samplers record more fish than are reported.

What is Sampled?

Salmon are sampled opportunistically as they are brought to port from subsistence coastal netting operations. Basic characteristics such as length and weight are taken further to the collection of tissue samples to understand the region of origin through genetics. Scale samples are collected to reveal the individual life history of each salmon (e.g. how many years did it spend in freshwater and at sea, what was the growth rate while at sea?). Sampling in previous years demonstrates that all captures are multi-sea winter salmon meaning that after leaving their home river they will spend more than one winter at sea before returning.

All salmon are also searched for the presence of tags which come in many forms and can be external or internal. If the salmon is adipose fin-clipped then it is extensively searched with magnifying glass and metal detector as this is an indication that a tag could be present. Tagging is still the only way to understand the exact origin of each salmon. However, genetic analysis is rapidly improving and now has the ability to assign a fish to broad geographical regions (e.g. countries) with a high level of precision.

Insights from the Data

ICES maintains a database of Greenland tag recoveries with around 6000 records from Canada, France, Faroes, Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, Spain and all parts of the UK. Analysis show that salmon from Northern Europe have a more easterly distribution within Greenland than fish from southern Europe. Across the West Greenland ports sampled, North American fish were more commonly found in the Northern regions (including Maniitsoq where I am stationed) than European-origin fish (see map below). Based on the time between tagging and capture it is also thought that North American fish take a more direct route to West Greenland than European fish.

 Map showing NAFO Divisions at West Greenland

Further Information:

 

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Vacancy – Zooplankton Analyst – closing date 2 October

Marine Scotland Blog - Wed, 2018-09-12 10:00

We are currently seeking applications for a Zooplankton Analyst within the Ecology and Conservation Group of Marine Scotland Science based in Aberdeen. This is a Fair and Open Fixed Term (24 months) and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The main role of this post is to undertake routine taxonomic analysis of zooplankton samples in support of monitoring and research programmes. The post will include participation in research surveys, data entry and ensuring quality control of databases. The post holder will also assist in laboratory management.

Qualifications Required:
You must hold an HND or B.Sc. in biological or environmental science.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

Essential Criteria:

  1. Experience in identifying and enumerating marine zooplankton using light microscopy techniques.
  2. Experience of fieldwork, performing sampling activities that can be applied to an inshore coastal ecosystem monitoring trip.
  3. Experience compiling numeric data and ability to report in both written and oral forms.
  4. Experience of working with databases and statistical software.

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Dr Peter Wright who can be reached at Peter.Wright@gov.scot or on 01312443224 or Dr Margarita Machairopoulou at Margarita.Machairopoulou@gov.scot or on 01312443213.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the resourcing team on 01312445597 or via recruitment@gov.scot.

Further information for this job:

You should read each of the Essential Criteria and think about a time or an example that can help demonstrate your knowledge/skills. Remember, this must be evidence based and your answers should be clear, concise and reflect what actions you undertook. You may want to use the STAR(R) approach to respond to each criterion.

The post Vacancy – Zooplankton Analyst – closing date 2 October appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Celebrating the Year of the Engineer – Going with the Flow

Marine Scotland Blog - Tue, 2018-09-11 10:00

Flowmeter

As we mentioned in our blog in January, 2018 is the Year of the Engineer as well as the Year of the Young Person. Over the course of the year, we’ll be introducing you to some of our incredibly talented engineers, as well as showing your some of their work. This month, it’s another of our own in-house creative solutions – the electronic flowmeter.

For many years, towed biological samplers were fitted with a mechanical flowmeter (known as a TSK flowmeter) to calculate the volume of water that passed/filtered through them.

Scientists within Marine Scotland approached their engineering colleagues to see if they could design an electronic version to fit inside their Bongo net. Ideally, there were looking for something which was lighter and easier to maintain. In addition, the new flowmeter had to switch on when it was in the water and had only to count as the sampler was retrieved from the seabed – not for the whole time it was in the water.

With the aid of a custom designed circuit, an innovative piece of programming and an bespoke built housing, our engineers met the specification! Since then, the Bongo net containing the flowmeter has been deployed successfully, each week at the coastal monitoring site off Stonehaven.

Over the years the design has been modified and an external and internal flowmeter is now fitted to a Gulf IIV mackerel egg sampler.

More information

The post Celebrating the Year of the Engineer – Going with the Flow appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Doors Open Day 2018

Marine Scotland Photos - Mon, 2018-09-10 15:02

Marine Scotland Image Bank posted a photo:

Doors Open Day 2018

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Marine Scotland 2018

Doors Open Day 2018

Marine Scotland Photos - Mon, 2018-09-10 15:02

Marine Scotland Image Bank posted a photo:

Doors Open Day 2018

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Marine Scotland 2018

Doors Open Day 2018

Marine Scotland Photos - Mon, 2018-09-10 15:02

Marine Scotland Image Bank posted a photo:

Doors Open Day 2018

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Marine Scotland 2018

Doors Open Day 2018

Marine Scotland Photos - Mon, 2018-09-10 15:02

Marine Scotland Image Bank posted a photo:

Doors Open Day 2018

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Marine Scotland 2018

Doors Open Day 2018

Marine Scotland Photos - Mon, 2018-09-10 15:02

Marine Scotland Image Bank posted a photo:

Doors Open Day 2018

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Marine Scotland 2018

Doors Open Day 2018

Marine Scotland Photos - Mon, 2018-09-10 15:02

Marine Scotland Image Bank posted a photo:

Doors Open Day 2018

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Marine Scotland 2018

Supporting science at school with a Royal Society Partnership Grant

Marine Scotland Blog - Mon, 2018-09-10 10:00

Data LoggersOur Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory in Pitlochry and Breadalbane Academy  in Aberfeldy are celebrating after receiving a Royal Society Partnership Grant, allowing them to work together on a project to explore the effects of hydro dams on river temperatures in the school’s local catchment, the River Tay.

Royal Society Partnership Grants support schools to enable students to carry out projects in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (known as STEM subjects), in partnership with a STEM organisation (research or industry). The Royal Society identify successful projects as those which provide students with insights into cutting edge developments in STEM fields, improved perceptions of the diversity of STEM professions and participation in an investigation in which they can feel a personal ownership and pride.

In our collaboration, a number of possible research investigations for S3 students have been proposed, which have the potential to evolve in their duration and complexity. The Royal Society Grant allows Breadalbane Academy to purchase 20 data loggers to monitor river temperature and a field laptop computer for to help monitor their deployment and to download the information they receive and Marine Scotland will be providing the remaining hardware required to anchor loggers in rivers and software to deploy and download loggers.

In addition, Marine Scotland will also provide critical support to ensure data quality and provide centralised data storage and recalibration for the data-loggers. Support is also being provided by Tay District Salmon Fishery Board who will share their knowledge of the river catchment and assist with logger deployment.

This project provides a platform for a long-term partnership between Marine Scotland, Breadalbane Academy and the Tay District Salmon Fishery Board and all parties will benefit from the from data collectedf

Further Information

The post Supporting science at school with a Royal Society Partnership Grant appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Amazing Footage at Half-landing for Survey 1218S

Marine Scotland Blog - Fri, 2018-09-07 09:00

It’s Monday the 3rd of September and since the last blog post the team here have been squirreling away, successfully collecting video data from all of the planned stations at Rosemary Bank Seamount and are starting to collect still photos and video from Wyville Thomson Ridge. The weather has delayed us a little on this goal but we are back on track, and steaming ahead aiming to collect as much data as we possibly can before we come in to the half landing at Ullapool.

The half landing is anticipated by all staff by this point as stocks of chocolate and crisps have run dangerously low! Additionally at the half landing we will be bidding farewell to all but one of our MSS and JNCC colleagues but welcoming six new JNCC staff to the ship. With the promise of replenishing our snack food stock and a chance to stretch our legs on a little less wobbly footing; it is safe to say that everyone is looking forward to those 24 hours on dry land.

After the half landing it will be a race against the clock with only eight days left on the survey to try and gather as much data as possible from the two sites we plan to revisit; Wyville Thomson Ridge and Faroe Shetland Sponge Belt. The drop-frame camera system is the weapon of choice for finding out all we can about the animals that live in these two protected areas and catching a glimpse into the world they inhabit. If the chariot footage is any indication, the staff joining Scotia are in for a real treat with the diversity of the marine life and habitats within these two sites and the amazing footage we have already seen.

Further Information:

The post Amazing Footage at Half-landing for Survey 1218S appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Reality TV at its Best

Marine Scotland Blog - Thu, 2018-09-06 11:00

Survey: 1318A MRV Alba na Mara

Duration: 25th August – 10th September 2018

MRV Alba na Mara left Fraserburgh on Sunday the 26th of August, a day later than planned due to poor weather, to begin survey 1318A – the ‘Annual Nephrops Underwater TV (UWTV) Survey’. The areas to be covered are Moray Firth and Firth of Forth; first stop is the Moray Firth. TV operations went well for the first few days of the survey under the watchful eye of the long-standing Scientist-in-Charge (SIC) Adrian Weetman and Engineer Mike Watson.

On the 30th of August Alba na Mara returned to port for a changeover of scientists. After taking part in the UWTV survey for five years and shadowing Adrian for two, both Katie Boyle and Gerry Mc Allister were excited to take on the joint role of SIC for the second part of the survey. All TV stations in the Moray Firth were completed and after a well-deserved rest day for Engineer Mike in sunny Fraserburgh the Alba na Mara began her journey south to the Firth of Forth.

The post Reality TV at its Best appeared first on Marine Scotland.

MPV Jura arriving in Aberdeen Harbour

Marine Scotland Photos - Wed, 2018-09-05 16:45

Marine Scotland Image Bank posted a photo:

MPV Jura arriving in Aberdeen Harbour

Photographed by Mhairi Sinclair
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Marine Scotland
2018

MPV Jura and Aberdeen harbour/skyline

Marine Scotland Photos - Wed, 2018-09-05 16:45

Marine Scotland Image Bank posted a photo:

MPV Jura and Aberdeen harbour/skyline

Photographed by Mhairi Sinclair
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Marine Scotland
2018

The Latest News from Survey 1218S

Marine Scotland Blog - Wed, 2018-09-05 11:23

It is 3am and we’re on our way to Rosemary Bank. We’ve had three nights of towing the chariot across the different depths at Faroe Shetland Sponge Belt and three days of sampling the fish and benthic fauna with trawls, and we’ve seen lots of sponges, bizarre invertebrates, and fish. We’ve recorded lots of video of the sea bed and it’s building up a good picture of the depths at which the narrow band of sponges starts and finishes.

We’re now looking in a little bit more detail at some of the data we have gathered whilst we’re steaming to Rosemary Bank; so we will have a better idea of where to deploy our drop camera on the second leg of the survey which will be revisiting the sponge belt for a closer look.

We should arrive at Rosemary Bank in a few hours, hopefully with enough time to complete a chariot tow before our shift ends. The weather forecast doesn’t look too good for the middle of this week- the swell is expected to increase to 3.5m, which will be too high to operate the chariot effectively. It’s likely that we will lose one night of survey time due to this, so we will need to re-evaluate our plans.

We have begun our depth stratified trawl transect that will take us from the warm NE Atlantic waters of the Rockall Basin, up and over the Wyville Thomson Ridge and then down into the Arctic-influenced water of the Faroe-Bank Channel. We have begun the transect some 30 miles east of Rosemary Seamount and have so far undertaken a line of trawls at depths of approximately: 1800m, 1600m, 1200m and 1200m working north. We have encountered diverse assemblages of fish at each depth, two of which are shown here:

Fish assemblage from 1200m depth

Fish assemblage from 1200m depth -Blog

Fish assemblage from 1800m depth

Fish assemblage from 1800m depth - Blog

Further Information:

The post The Latest News from Survey 1218S appeared first on Marine Scotland.

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