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The Scotia went to CTD to see what she could ADCP

Marine Scotland Blog - 6 hours 6 min ago

MRV ScotiaDuration: 6-16 October 2017

Gear

Sea-Bird CTDs (Conductivity, Pressure & Depth), ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) instrumentation and AL-200 frame, water filtering equipment, bacteria sampling and experimental equipment, including bacterial culture equipment with CO2 gas enrichment (HWU), mooring equipment and recovery trawl.

Objectives

  1. Test the CTD in the Buchan Deep off Peterhead
  2.  Perform hydrographic sampling along the JONSIS long term monitoring section in the northern North Sea.
  3.  Deploy ADCP on JONSIS line in AL-200 frame (AECO).
  4. Recover and download the data from a single string ACDP mooring on the Fair Isle – Munken section in the FSC (NWS-E).
  5. Re-deploy one ADCP mooring at a position on Fair Isle – Munken section.
  6. Take surface water samples near FIM 8 location for phytoplankton and bacterial analysis and experimentation (HWU).
  7.  Perform hydrographic sampling along the long term monitoring Faroe-Shetland Channel Nolso – Flugga (NOL/NWE) section.
  8.  Perform hydrographic sampling along the long term monitoring Faroe-Shetland Channel Fair Isle – Munken (NWS) section.
  9. Take water samples for long term storage on two Fair Isle – Munken or Nolso – Flugga section stations.
  10. Take water samples for bacteria analysis at selected stations on the monitoring lines.
  11.  Recover one ADCP mooring at a position on Faroe-Shetland Channel Faroe – Cape Wrath (FCW/NWZ) section (NWZ-E).
  12.  Perform hydrographic sampling in the vicinity of the above ADCP mooring in order to calibrate the mooring equipment.
  13. Perform a CTD transect along a Stonehaven AlterEco section (going west from 2° E).

Procedure

On sailing, Scotia will carry out test deployments of the CTD and carousel around the Buchan Deep, using the standard deployment procedures (10 m soak); sampling procedures will also be rehearsed at the test station. Scotia will then make passage to the start of the JONSIS long term monitoring section to carry out sampling with the CTD and carousel water sampler.  On completion of the JONSIS section, passage will be made to the mooring location on the JONSIS line, where the ADCP in the AL-200 will be deployed.

On completion, passage will be made to the ADCP mooring site on the Fair Isle – Munken (FIM) section, where the ADCP mooring will be recovered and a CTD profile performed. Scotia will then stay on site while the data is downloaded and the mooring refurbished for re-deployment. Scotia will then make her way to FIM-08 for water sampling for phytoplankton and bacteria (time permitting) before sailing to the western end of the Nolso – Flugga (NOL) section.

Water samples and CTD profiles will be taken along the NOL section. Scotia will then proceed to the FIM section to carry out standard CTD and water sampling along that line.  Along the standard sections water samples will be taken at a subset of stations for bacterial work by HWU visitors.  After the FIM section Scotia will sail to the mooring location on the Faroe – Cape Wrath (FCW) line (NWZE) where the mooring will be recovered and CTD profile performed. Scotia will then make her way to the eastern end of the Stonehaven CTD line and make her way back west along the line performing CTD profiles.

Further Information

The post The Scotia went to CTD to see what she could ADCP appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Doors Open Day in Stonehaven - 2017

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Knowing your parasites – inside and out

Marine Scotland Blog - Wed, 2017-09-20 10:00

Ensuring Scotland’s marine environment is managed effectively and sustainable is crucial for future generations – and this includes, literally, all creatures great and small.

To support this, in September,  representatives from Marine Scotland, Aberdeen University and the University of Cape Town hosted a two day MASTS-funded workshop in Aberdeen focussing on “Parasites of Commercially Important Marine Fish Species and their Potential as Population Biological Tags”.

The workshop comprised of a day of laboratory-based practical parasite screening work utilising cod and haddock kindly collected by colleagues on a recent research survey on MRV Scotia.  The laboratory based practical was carried out at the Department of Zoology, University of Aberdeen and was followed by a day of presentations at Marine Scotland’s Marine Laboratory in Aberdeen given by invited speakers, including Dr Ken MacKenzie from the University of Aberdeen, Dr Cecile Reed from University of Cape Town, South Africa, and Drs Neil Campbell and Campbell Pert from Marine Scotland. In addition, there were a number of postgraduate students who had the opportunity to share their research with their peers.

Attending this workshop allowed attendees to develop their fish parasitology skills and techniques, and allowed students and early career scientists the opportunity to present their research in the field of marine fisheries parasitology to an International audience of parasite experts in the less intimidating environment of a workshop rather than a large conference. Furthermore, the knowledge gained from the meeting will not only contribute to the attendees’ understanding of a range of fish parasitology issues but will also allow delegates to disseminate information to their peers and the wider MASTS community.

Dr Campbell Pert

 

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IA2017 – Eutrophication is still a problem in some areas

Marine Scotland Blog - Mon, 2017-09-18 10:00

Eutrophication graphic

Eutrophication is the result of excessive enrichment of water with nutrients. This can cause accelerated growth of algae (phytoplankton) and plants. This may result in an undesirable disturbance to the balance of organisms present and ultimately to a decline in the overall water quality.

Eutrophication is not always a local problem. Water masses continuously move and interact, and the associated transport of nutrients can lead to eutrophication effects away from the source.

Owing to the adverse environmental impacts of eutrophication, OSPAR conducts periodic assessments of the eutrophication status across the OSPAR Maritime Area.

The results of the latest eutrophication assessment (for the period 2006–2014) indicate that eutrophication still occurs in the OSPAR Maritime Area, particularly in areas sensitive to nutrient inputs, such as estuaries, fjords and bights, and in areas affected by river plumes. In particular, there is high eutrophication pressure on the south eastern coast of the Greater North Sea and some localised areas of the Celtic Seas. This is despite the reduced input of nutrients and lower concentrations of nutrients observed in the marine environment.

Although the extent of eutrophication in the OSPAR Maritime Area has continued to improve since 1990, concerns about atmospheric and riverine inputs of nutrients identified in OSPAR’s Quality Status Report 2010 still remain.

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