Marine Scotland Blog

Subscribe to Marine Scotland Blog feed Marine Scotland Blog
Scottish Government Blog
Updated: 8 min 7 sec ago

Controls for wild wrasse fisheries

5 hours 5 min ago

Mandatory controls over the harvesting of wild wrasse for managing sea lice in the salmon farming industry have been announced by Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing.

The new measures are to be introduced following a recent consultation with the industry and will be brought into effect from 1 May 2021. Fishers will have to meet certain criteria, show they have an appropriate relationship with an aquaculture business and have a proven track record to obtain a permit for harvesting wild wrasse.

The move is expected to improve management of the fishery, provide clear instructions to all those involved, and secure better reporting of activity and data from fishers to Marine Scotland.

Mr Ewing said:

“These measures will support the sustainable growth of our valuable aquaculture industry while also maintaining the right balance across our economic, environmental and social responsibilities.

“Mandatory measures for wild wrasse harvesting will help to maintain healthy stocks of this fish which is so important for treating and controlling lice in our salmon farms while improvements to the way we consider regulation of fish farms will ensure the impact from interactions with iconic wild salmon and sea trout is reduced.

“We will work with fishers to help ensure reasonable fishing opportunities remain, that there is access for new entrants to wrasse fishing and that there is a fair recruitment system that takes into account sustainability and the aspirations of fishermen who may wish to diversify. This is an area we will continue to develop. Measures will be kept under review and we will look to refine them as more evidence, data and technology becomes available.

“As we look ahead to economic recovery and the development of the Blue Economy, sustainability must be at the heart of what we do to ensure future generations can enjoy all of the beauty and nature that Scotland has to offer whilst safeguarding jobs in some of our most rural and fragile communities.”

Background

The Analysis of responses to the consultation on Proposed New Mandatory Fishing Measures for Wild Wrasse Harvesting will be published in due course.

The post Controls for wild wrasse fisheries appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Senior Policy Officer, Regional Marine Planning – closing date 10 December

8 hours 40 min ago

We are currently seeking applications for Senior Policy Officer – Regional Marine Planning within the Marine Scotland department based in Edinburgh. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

Marine Scotland is responsible for managing Scotland’s seas ensuring prosperity and environmental sustainability. Effective marine planning is at the heart of this, ensuring that the marine and coastal environment is managed in an integrated and holistic way. In 2015 Scotland published its first National Marine Plan – a single framework for managing our seas.

The primary focus of the role will be to facilitate and manage marine planning and related strategic environmental and socio-economic projects in relation to the development of offshore renewables in Scottish Waters. These initiatives aim to support and inform the development and location of commercial scale offshore renewable energy developments in Scottish Waters. The Scottish Government is published a Sectoral Marine Plan for Offshore Wind on 28 October 2020. This post will play a key role in both the co-ordination and strategic direction of the programme board established to drive forward the important process of Iterative Plan Review (IPR).

Important Information Regarding Interviews

In recognition of the Scottish Government’s ongoing measures and guidance in its response to Covid-19 (Coronavirus), we would like to advise applicants that a decision has been taken that all interviews must be conducted in a virtual/remote setting.

In order to facilitate this new way of working, we are asking all applicants to ensure that they have a suitable space to complete the virtual interview as well as a personal device of choice by which you can undertake the interview/assessment if selected. The Remote Interviews will be conducted by WebEx. We are also asking you to ensure that your personal Wi-Fi/Broadband capacity will be sufficient to carry both audio and video feeds to undertake the interview. This will then ensure that there are no issues incurred during the interview.

Further Information for this job

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Damon Hewlett who can be reached at damon.hewlett@gov.scot.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the Resourcing Team via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Senior Policy Officer, Regional Marine Planning – closing date 10 December appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Seaman 1A – closing date 9 December

Mon, 2020-11-30 15:30

We are currently seeking applications for a Seaman 1A within Marine Scotland based in Edinburgh. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

There are currently vacancies available for the post of Seaman 1A based on board our vessels. The posts are primarily based on our Research Vessels MRV Alba Na Mara and MRV Scotia, although it is expected that the successful candidate will also be prepared to work on the protection vessels if required. MRV Alba Na Mara and MRV Scotia are 27 metres and 69 metres in length respectively.  Research cruises vary in length, but generally are no more than 22 days.

The Marine Protection Vessels are Minna, Jura and Hirta. Minna is 47 metres in length and both Jura and Hirta are 84 metres in length. These vessels carry out patrols which normally last no more than 21 days.

All vessels work double crewing manning allowing for trip on/trip off rostering.

Important Information Regarding Interviews

In recognition of the Scottish Government’s ongoing measures and guidance in its response to Covid-19 (Coronavirus), we would like to advise applicants that a decision has been taken that all interviews must be conducted in a virtual/remote setting.

In order to facilitate this new way of working, we are asking all applicants to ensure that they have a suitable space to complete the virtual interview as well as a personal device of choice with an account registered to the ‘Zoom’ app by which you can undertake the interview/assessment if selected. We are also asking you to ensure that your personal Wi-Fi/Broadband capacity will be sufficient to carry both audio and video feeds to undertake the interview. This will then ensure that there are no issues incurred during the interview.

Further Information for this job

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Mari Valli or Lewis Mitchell at mscompliancebsu@gov.scot.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact HR Resourcing at recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Seaman 1A – closing date 9 December appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Sectoral Marine Plan for Offshore Wind Energy

Thu, 2020-11-26 11:01

In conversation with Mairi Gougeon, Minister for Rural Affairs and the Natural Environment, about the Scottish Government’s recently published Sectoral Marine Plan for Offshore Wind Energy.

Minister, thanks for speaking with us. Firstly can you give us a bit of background about the Scottish Government’s Sectoral Marine Plan for Offshore Wind Energy?

MG: Certainly. As many people will be aware, commercial-scale offshore wind energy is a fast-developing sector – particularly in Scotland where our seas provide some of the best opportunities for offshore wind generation in the world. Supporting this industry is an essential feature of the future clean energy system and a potential key driver of economic growth.

As a nation with an abundance of renewable energy resources, opportunities exist not only to meet domestic needs – contributing to our world leading climate change targets – but also to export low carbon energy to the rest of UK and Europe. To date, Scotland has seen a significant amount of offshore wind energy activity, with 14 offshore wind farms having received consent, six of which are currently operational, equating to a total generating capacity of just over 5 Gigawatts (GW).

Our first Sectoral Marine Plan for Offshore Wind Energy was adopted in 2011 and it has helped pave the way for the first tranche of Scottish projects. Now as we look to ramp up our ambition further to meet our target of a net zero society by 2045, we have published this new draft Sectoral Marine Plan for Offshore Wind Energy covering both Scottish inshore and offshore waters. It aims to identify the areas of our seas where commercial-scale offshore wind could be developed, including deep water wind technologies.

Following extensive consultation with marine sectors, environmental organisations and coastal communities, we have now published the finalised Plan which takes into account the responses to the consultation. The Plan will inform the seabed leasing process for commercial offshore wind energy in Scottish waters.

The Plan was published alongside our Offshore Wind Policy Statement which sets out the Scottish Government’s ambitious goal to increase offshore capacity to 11GW by 2030 – enough to power more than eight million homes.

What areas have been identified as suitable sites for offshore wind?

MG: A total of 15 sites have been identified, the majority in the seas to the north and east of Scotland. This is a reduction from the 17 proposed in the draft plan as we removed two sites in response to feedback received as part of our consultation exercise. As a result of that consultation, we have also made changes to the boundaries of some of the sites identified to help reduce the potential for negative impact.

What factors influenced your decision to choose these sites?

MG: Over a number of years, Marine Scotland have been carefully considering the different factors that may be impacted by the development of offshore wind as well as looking at the areas of the sea which have the most potential, in terms of electricity generation.

A detailed and thorough environmental and socio-economic assessment was carried out for each site. While clearly the development of offshore wind will have some impact on the environment, we have sought to minimise any negative impacts as far as possible when choosing the final 15 sites.

Similarly, the socio-economic impacts of the development of offshore wind – such as the impact on fishing, tourism and commercial shipping – were given careful consideration by Marine Scotland with a full and detailed report.

Two rounds of public consultation were also critical in helping to shape the final Plan.

Ultimately we believe that the sites chosen strike the right balance between minimising any potential adverse effects on other marine users, economic sectors and the environment and maximising the opportunities for economic development, investment and employment in Scotland

How are you protecting marine life?

MG: There is minimal overlap with Marine Protected Areas and whilst none of the Plan options overlap directly with other designated sites, such as Special Protection Areas, some are within the foraging ranges of bird species from SPAs. Any future developments will be required to take this into account at the project level with appropriate surveys, research and mitigation measures.

So, what happens next?

MG: Now we have finalised the Plan, Crown Estate Scotland can progress to the next stage of the ScotWind Leasing process – which grants property rights for seabed in Scottish waters for new commercial scale offshore wind project development.

The construction of developments depend on the timing, type and scale of project and any technical, environmental and economic constraints that could limit the scale and timings. The plan however does set out some areas and regions where work could be taken forward more quickly than others and includes low, medium and high deployment scenarios.

We anticipate that licence and consent applications likely to be submitted in the mid-2020s and survey work to be undertaken from this point. Construction work could commence from late 2020 onwards.

The Plan is the first step in an ongoing journey to meet our energy and climate goals. Furthermore, this plan will help facilitate a green recovery from COVID-19 in Scotland and help to take us to net-zero by 2045.

The post Sectoral Marine Plan for Offshore Wind Energy appeared first on Marine Scotland.

UK Fisheries Act

Tue, 2020-11-24 16:17

Commenting on the UK Fisheries Act receiving Royal Assent, Fisheries Secretary Fergus Ewing said:

“While this Act will provide a necessary framework to manage fisheries from 1 January 2021, we continue to believe that the best future for Scotland is as an independent nation in the European Union.

“Nothing in this legislation can compensate for the loss of our biggest seafood markets in the EU and the wider damage that it will cause to our coastal communities.

“With just over five weeks until the end of the transition period, the UK Government must urgently clarify how it will provide us with the multi-year funding which was available from the EU, and support the new powers. We will also continue to oppose, in the strongest possible terms, any attempt by the UK Government to undermine devolved competence over fisheries and other interests through its Internal Market Bill.

“The Fisheries Act demonstrates what we and many stakeholders have long argued – that frameworks, which are negotiated and agreed by the UK and devolved administrations, rather than being imposed by the UK Government, are the only tool needed to manage different policy approaches upon EU Exit. The Internal Market Bill is unnecessary, and will cut across the frameworks process and fundamentally undermine devolution.

“The delivery of the Fisheries Act in Scotland will be supported through the development of our Future Fisheries Management plans. Sustainability will be at the heart of the strategy, which will be published before the end of the year.”

The post UK Fisheries Act appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Nature of Scotland Awards Countdown

Tue, 2020-11-24 14:00

With the Nature of Scotland awards taking place tomorrow we’re excited for all the nominees that have been shortlisted, but especially so for our colleagues!

Co-sponsored by NatureScot and RSPB Scotland the Nature of Scotland awards comprise nine award categories all celebrating the excellence, innovation and outstanding achievement in nature conservation.

Dr Faye Jackson has been nominated for the SAGES ‘Conservation Science Award’ for early career researchers for her work on ‘the development of novel monitoring and modelling methodologies to understand and predict spatio-temporal variability in river temperature.Graphic showing process of Scotland’s River Temperature Monitoring Network

This work, which included collaboration with researchers from Marine Scotland Science (MSS), the University of Birmingham, and practitioners from Fisheries Management Scotland, established the Scotland River Temperature Monitoring Network (SRTMN), the first ever strategically designed and quality controlled temperature monitoring network in the UK.

Using data collected from the network it has been possible to model river temperature and identify priority areas for management. This work is of key importance to safeguard our iconic wild salmon, as it provides a practical tool to prioritise climate change adaptation measures like riparian tree planting.

The objectives of SRTMN are to: 

  1. Develop large-scale spatial statistical models to understand and predict river temperatures across Scotland.
  2. Identify the warmest and most climatically sensitive (those likely to change most under climate change) rivers.
  3. Understand the effects of bankside shading on river temperature in different environmental settings.
  4. Develop tools to enable river managers to prioritise tree planting to mitigate the effects of climate change on Scottish rivers.
  5. Measure and assess long-term changes in river water temperature.

Also nominated, but in the ‘Coast and Waters’ category is Flapper Skate Conservation a collaboration between: St. Andrews University, University of Aberdeen, NatureScot and Marine Scotland. It was developed from a project led by the Ecology and Conservation Group within MSS that preceded the designation of the Loch Sunart to the Sound of Jura Marine Protected Area (MPA), designated in 2015 to protect common skate, also known as flapper skate.Skate minus bait

We wish everyone the best of luck and will be tuning in to the a virtual live streamed event online from 7pm tomorrow.

To register for free please follow this link.

Further Information:

The post Nature of Scotland Awards Countdown appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Scotia to the rescue

Tue, 2020-11-17 14:00

Colleagues on our marine research vessel (MRV) Scotia recently came to the assistance of the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) while they were out conducting sampling work in the Faroe-Shetland Channel.

Crew recovering Autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV)

Crew recovering Autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV)

The scientists onboard Scotia received notification from the Marine Autonomous Robotic Systems (MARS) facility, within NOC, that the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) they were piloting, remotely, was in trouble.

The AUV had sprung a leak as it crossed the 200 m depth contour west of Lewis, on its way to Rosemary Bank, as part of collaborative work between NOC and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) and was in need of emergency recovery.

At the time Scotia was quite far away, some 180 nautical miles, doing hydrographic sampling along the Fair Isle-Munken (FIM) line between Shetland and Faroes, which is regularly occupied by our oceanographers to monitor ocean circulation. However, the vessel was going in the right direction. So, in the following days, after completing FIM and doing some other work, they were just five hours away from the drifting AUV, or glider as they’re also commonly known, which had been sending regular messages to update on its current location.

As the Scotia approached in the dark, the remote pilot activated a strobe to assist with the recovery. As it got lighter, the pilot activated the release of a recovery line from the glider which the Scotia crew used to “fish it“ and land it safely onboard. With only some damage to one of the glider’s propeller blades the crew removed the wings to avoid further damage, and began their journey back to Aberdeen.

Our counterparts in NOC were very grateful for the efforts in the retrieval of the AUV which collects hydrographic data such as temperature, salinity and currents, and is used for studies of ocean circulation, including validating numerical models.

And tempting as it is to keep it, the oceanographers have agreed to give it back!

 

Further information

 

 

The post Scotia to the rescue appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Assistant Fisheries Biologist, closing date 27 November

Tue, 2020-11-17 10:30

We are currently seeking applications for an Assistant Fisheries Biologist within Marine Scotland based in Pitlochry. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

This post is based at the Marine Scotland Science Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory near Pitlochry and will sit with the Freshwater Environment Group that contributes to the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Programme. The post holder will work closely with a small team of three staff to operate the Girnock and Baddoch fish traps on the River Dee. These long-term monitoring sites provide valuable data that underpin scientific support for the management of salmon in Scotland. The post holder will undertake fieldwork assisting in the collection of data to monitor salmon populations at these sites.

Prospective applicants should note that the role involves a large amount of outdoor work, often in challenging conditions and in remote locations. Elements of this role are physically demanding, e.g. cleaning and lifting of steel trap screens, and applicants will need to be able to repetitively lift a weight of 30 kilos to clear a minimum vertical distance of 1.0 metre. The ability to do so will be tested if you are successful in being invited to interview.

Important Information Regarding Interviews

In recognition of the Scottish Government’s ongoing measures and guidance in its response to Covid-19 (Coronavirus), we would like to advise applicants that interviews will conducted in a virtual/remote setting. If you are short-listed at interview you will subsequently be invited to the Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory to undertake the practical test (see details below).

In order to facilitate this new way of working, we are asking all applicants to ensure that they have a suitable space to complete the virtual interview, as well as a personal device which has ability to video conference (e.g. Skype / MS Teams) and allow data to be entered and stored in a spreadsheet format compatible with Microsoft Excel, by which you can undertake the interview/assessment if selected.

We are also asking you to ensure that your personal Wi-Fi/Broadband capacity will be sufficient to carry both audio and video feeds to undertake the interview. This will then ensure that  no issues are incurred during the interview.

Practical test: The successful candidate must have the ability to safely lift weights of >30kg to shoulder height, which is required for cleaning and maintaining metal screens at the fish traps. If you are short-listed following the virtual interview and data entry practical you will be invited to attend the Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory to undertake the practical lifting test.

The practical lifting test will involve repeatedly lifting a steal fish trap screen, as is required at the traps. First, the lifting technique will be demonstrated by a current member of the Traps Team. You will then assess the weight yourself by lifting the weight a short distance from the ground.  If you feel confident that you can safely lift the weight using the demonstrated technique, then you will begin the lifting test. You will be asked to repeatedly lift the screen to clear a minimum vertical distance of 1.0 metre. This will be completed under observation to ensure safe lifting technique. If at any point you fail to exhibit appropriate technique or struggle with the test, then you will be asked to immediately stop lifting. This practical will take place outside following social distancing guidelines. Screens will be disinfected before and after lifting is undertaken.

Due to Covid-19 (Coronavirus) restrictions, candidates will not have access to the buildings so must arrive in suitable clothing to complete the lifting test in any weather conditions. Public toilets are available in Pitlochry: https://www.pkc.gov.uk/article/19430/Pitlochry-public-toilets.

Further Information

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Faye Jackson who can be reached at faye.jackson@gov.scot.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the Resourcing Team on NUMBER or via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Assistant Fisheries Biologist, closing date 27 November appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: IT Operations Manager, closing date 25 November

Tue, 2020-11-17 10:00
We are currently seeking applications for an IT Operations Manager within the Marine Lab based in Aberdeen. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments. DDaT Pay Supplement

This post attracts a £4,000.00 DDaT pay supplement after a 9 month DDaT competency qualifying period.  Pay supplements are temporary payments designed to address recruitment and retention issues caused by market pressures and are subject to regular review.

Overview

Marine Scotland is a Directorate of Scottish Government responsible for managing Scotland’s seas for prosperity and environmental sustainability and works closely with key delivery partners and others to achieve stated objectives.

Marine Scotland Science has a team dedicated to the management of its scientific IT infrastructure and applications. While Marine Scotland uses the Scottish Government’s SCOTS IT service, Science Division also has its own specialised IT infrastructure (the Off SCOTS Environment), comprising physical and virtualised Windows servers along with NetApp network attached storage, which is better suited to serving the requirements of scientists. The IT Operations Manager leads the Science IT Operations team ensuring effective running of the infrastructure, guidance and accountability for changes, developing policies, procedures and other documentation necessary for efficient management of the systems, and overall financial management.

To apply for this post, you will need to provide the information requested below via the online application process. These must be combined into one document as the system can only accept a single document upload per application. A CV (no longer than two pages) setting out your career history, with key responsibilities and achievements. Add to your CV your personal statement (no longer than 750 words) explaining why you consider your personal skills, qualities and experience suitable for this role, with particular reference to the criteria in the person specification. Failure to submit a single combined document (CV and personal statement) will mean the panel only have limited information on which to assess your application against the criteria in the person specification.

When considering how your experience relates to the role, please tailor your CV and personal statement to reflect the role and the essential skills/criteria as described in the job description/person specification.’ For further information on this post please contact Dave Keay at Dave.Keay@gov.scot.

Important Information Regarding Interviews

In recognition of the Scottish Government’s ongoing measures and guidance in its response to Covid-19 (Coronavirus), we would like to advise applicants that a decision has been taken that all interviews must be conducted in a virtual/remote setting. In order to facilitate this new way of working, we are asking all applicants to ensure that they have a suitable space to complete the virtual interview. In addition, a personal device of choice, which has the Skype for Business application downloaded.  This will allow candidates to undertake the interview/assessment if selected. We are also asking you to ensure that your personal Wi-Fi/Broadband capacity will be sufficient to carry both audio and video feeds.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the Resourcing Team on 0131 244 8500 or via recruitment@gov.scot.

Further information for this job

The post Vacancy: IT Operations Manager, closing date 25 November appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Marine Scotland Science Publications for October

Wed, 2020-11-11 10:00

Marine Scotland Science continues to sustain critical marine science delivery and has over the last couple of months produced the following notable publications:

  • Evans, T.J., Young, R.C., Watson, H., Olsson, O., & Åkesson, S. 2020. Effects of back‐mounted biologgers on condition, diving and flight performance in a breeding seabird. Journal of Avian Biology.
    Effects of back-mounted biologgers … link
  • Hentati-Sundberg, J., Olin, A.B., Evans, T.J., Isaksson, N., Berglund, P.‐A. & Olsson, O. 2020 A mechanistic framework to inform the spatial management of conflicting fisheries and top predators. Journal of Applied Ecology, 00: 1-10.
    A mechanistic framework to inform the … link
  • Horne, N., Culloch, R.M., Schmitt, P., Lieber, L., Wilson, B., Dale, A.C., Houghton, J.D.R & Kregting, L.T. 2021. Collision risk modelling for tidal energy devices: A flexible simulation-based approach. Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 278(1):111484.
    Collision risk modelling for tidal energy … link
  • Keogan, K., Lewis, S., Howells, R.J., Newell, M.A., Harris, M.P., Burthe, S., Phillips, R.A., Wanless, S., Phillimore, A.B. & Daunt, F. 2020. No evidence for fitness signatures consistent with increasing trophic mismatch over 30 years in a population of European shag Phalacrocorax aristotelis. Journal of Animal Ecology. Accepted Author Manuscript.
    No evidence for fitness signatures consistent with … link
  • Munir, D., Munro, E.S., Secombes, C.J. & Dooley, H. 2020. Atlantic salmon kidney (ASK) cells are an effective model to characterise interferon (IFN) and IFN-induced gene expression following salmonid alphavirus infection. Journal of Fish and Shellfish Immunology 106, 792 -795.
    Atlantic salmon kidney (ASK) cells are an effective … link
  • Munro, L.A. 2020. Scottish Fish Farm Production Survey 2019.
    Scottish Fish Farm Production Survey 2019 link
    The survey is the official statistics publication for Scottish finfish aquaculture production. The survey achieved returns from 100% of industry, in spite of complications due to COVID-19. Notably salmon production reached 203,881, which is a record. Rainbow trout production also increased 15% to 7,405 tonnes.
  • Soares, S.M.C., Stagg, H.E.B., Matthews, C.G.G., Smith, L.E., Turnbull, T. & Munro, E.S. 2020. A case study reporting the occurrence of amoebic gill disease in a public marine aquarium. 156, Bulletin of the European Association of Fish Pathologists, 40(4) 2020.
    During a routine health check, two Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), populating one of the tanks within the re-circulating sea water system, showed clinical signs of amoebic gill disease (AGD), a condition caused by the parasite Neoparamoeba perurans (syn. Paramoeba perurans).
  • Two topic sheets published:
Additional Information

The post Marine Scotland Science Publications for October appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Preparing for EU Exit

Mon, 2020-11-09 12:59

A series of webinars are being organised to help seafood businesses prepare for changes to import and export processes for trade with the EU and Northern Ireland, that will come into effect from 1 January 2021.

The three sessions will look at the new requirements for importing and exporting non-live fishery products, importing and exporting live fishery products  and what is required for moving goods as part of the Northern Ireland Protocol.

The sessions which are being jointly organised by the Scottish Government and Seafish provide an opportunity for commercial fisheries, traders and aquaculture production businesses to see the changes demonstrated through examples of product journeys from Scotland to the EU.  A panel of experts will be on hand to listen to questions on preparing for these new requirements.

Businesses who fish and export Live Bivalve Molluscs, such as scallops, cockles, mussels and oysters which have been caught in the wild, are also being encouraged to take part in a survey which runs until the end of November. The results from the survey will help the Scottish Government identify ways of supporting the industry adjust to the changes which come into effect next year.

Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing said:

“These new webinars will provide Scottish fishermen and businesses with more clarity and help them understand the new export and import processes. By participating in the Scottish Government’s survey it will also help us better understand trade patterns and what support businesses require.”

Background

Sign up for the sessions:

  • 12 November  – Importing and exporting non-live fishery products – sign in via Zoom Link – Meeting ID 844 3330 8159 / Passcode: 744400
  • 18 November – Importing and exporting live fishery products – sign in via Zoom Link – Meeting ID: 880 8018 6577 / Passcode: 089907
  • 2 December – Moving goods under the Northern Ireland Protocol – sign in via Zoom Link – Meeting ID: 834 0155 3599 / Passcode: @8nFv#

The survey will close at the end of November.

The post Preparing for EU Exit appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Launch of inshore fisheries pilot

Thu, 2020-11-05 12:30

Working in partnership with the local fishing industry via Regional Inshore Fisheries Groups, the Scottish Government has developed a pilot scheme that will test approaches to improving valuable shellfish stocks and reducing gear conflict within an area to the East of the Outer Hebrides.

Starting on 5 November, the Outer Hebrides Inshore Fisheries Pilot will introduce locally agreed limits on creel numbers and soak time.Poster showing map and details about the Outer Hebrides Inshore Fisheries Pilot area

Forty vessels will also be testing a low-cost tracking system as part of the ‘Modernisation of the Inshore Fleet Programme’, paving the way for more responsive fisheries management decision making.

This pilot will provide the Scottish Government with insights into how well a localised approach to modernising inshore fishing is working. Marine Scotland Science will then analyse data outputs, comparing historical data held on the pilot area to that gathered during its life cycle to measure any notable changes and there will be an evaluation of the wider social and economic impacts of the pilot for fishers and fishing businesses.

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Economy and Tourism, Fergus Ewing said: “The launch of the Outer Hebrides Pilot is an important milestone in our work to test and trial new fisheries management arrangements.  This pilot will help inform our Future of Fisheries Management Strategy in Scotland, helping support sustainable growth in the sector and enable coastal communities to make the most of their waters.”

Duncan Macinnes of the Outer Hebrides Regional Inshore Fisheries Group added: “We welcome the strong support provided by the Scottish Government to the Outer Hebrides Regional Inshore Fisheries Group,  in taking forward this innovative approach to the local management of the static gear fishery in the pilot area.

“The tracking technology fitted to vessels will provide additional information to the Scottish Government by identifying fishing effort and catches from more localised grounds.

“Hopefully, the findings from the pilot can be used to extend the principle of local management of creel fisheries to other inshore areas around Scotland.”

If you fish within the pilot area

If you fish within the pilot area, you may have already received a letter of derogation in the post. If you have not, please contact your local fishery office, or email inshore@gov.scot and we will be glad to assist you.

You should ensure you keep a paper or electronic copy of this document on board your vessel at all times when deploying creels within the pilot area.

Further Information

The post Launch of inshore fisheries pilot appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Assistant Fisheries Biologist, Pitlochry – closing date 11 November

Mon, 2020-11-02 13:15

We are currently seeking applications for an Assistant Fisheries Biologist within Marine Scotland based in Pitlochry. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

This post is based at the Marine Scotland Science Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory near Pitlochry and will sit with the Freshwater Environment Group that contributes to the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Programme. The post holder will work closely with a small team of three staff to operate the Girnock and Baddoch fish traps on the River Dee. These long-term monitoring sites provide valuable data that underpin scientific support for the management of salmon in Scotland. The post holder will undertake fieldwork assisting in the collection of data to monitor salmon populations at these sites.

Prospective applicants should note that the role involves a large amount of outdoor work, often in challenging conditions and in remote locations. Elements of this role are physically demanding, e.g. cleaning and lifting of steel trap screens, and applicants will need to be able to repetitively lift a weight of 30 kilos to clear a minimum vertical distance of 1.0 metre. The ability to do so will be tested if you are successful in being invited to interview.

Important Information Regarding Interviews:

In recognition of the Scottish Government’s ongoing measures and guidance in its response to Covid-19 (Coronavirus), we would like to advise applicants that interviews will conducted in a virtual/remote setting. If you are short-listed at interview you will subsequently be invited to the Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory to undertake the practical test (see details below).

In order to facilitate this new way of working, we are asking all applicants to ensure that they have a suitable space to complete the virtual interview, as well as a personal device which has ability to video conference (e.g. Skype / MS Teams) and allow data to be entered and stored in a spreadsheet format compatible with Microsoft Excel, by which you can undertake the interview/assessment if selected.

We are also asking you to ensure that your personal Wi-Fi/Broadband capacity will be sufficient to carry both audio and video feeds to undertake the interview. This will then ensure that  no issues are incurred during the interview.

Practical test: The successful candidate must have the ability to safely lift weights of >30kg to shoulder height, which is required for cleaning and maintaining metal screens at the fish traps. If you are short-listed following the virtual interview and data entry practical you will be invited to attend the Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory to undertake the practical lifting test.

The practical lifting test will involve repeatedly lifting a steal fish trap screen, as is required at the traps. First, the lifting technique will be demonstrated by a current member of the Traps Team. You will then assess the weight yourself by lifting the weight a short distance from the ground.  If you feel confident that you can safely lift the weight using the demonstrated technique, then you will begin the lifting test. You will be asked to repeatedly lift the screen to clear a minimum vertical distance of 1.0 metre. This will be completed under observation to ensure safe lifting technique. If at any point you fail to exhibit appropriate technique or struggle with the test, then you will be asked to immediately stop lifting. This practical will take place outside following social distancing guidelines. Screens will be disinfected before and after lifting is undertaken.

Due to Covid-19 (Coronavirus) restrictions, candidates will not have access to the buildings so must arrive in suitable clothing to complete the lifting test in any weather conditions. Public toilets are available in Pitlochry: https://www.pkc.gov.uk/article/19430/Pitlochry-public-toilets.

Further Information for this job:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date.

To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Faye Jackson who can be reached at faye.jackson@gov.scot.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the Resourcing Team on NUMBER or via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Assistant Fisheries Biologist, Pitlochry – closing date 11 November appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Assistant Fisheries Scientist, Montrose – closing date 11 November

Mon, 2020-11-02 13:00

We are currently seeking applications for an Assistant Fisheries Scientist within the Marine Scotland based in Montrose. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

Based in Montrose, the Salmon Assessment Group is responsible for collecting high quality data on the exploitation, abundance and biological characteristics of adult salmon stocks in Scotland.  This work is key to the success of the Conservation Regulations which form the regulatory framework for managing Scottish salmon fisheries, based on the conservation status of individual river stocks. This post supports our biological sampling programme of adult salmon and the operation of in-river fish counters providing fishery-independent estimates of abundance.

Fish counter data, together with reported catches, allow salmon abundance to be estimated from fishery data for those stocks where fish counter data are not available.  Biological sampling provides data on the size and age composition of returning adult salmon stocks as well as the sex ratios of individual age classes.  The characteristics vary both seasonally and through the years and are required for assessing the status of salmon stocks.

Important Information Regarding Interviews:

In recognition of the Scottish Government’s ongoing measures and guidance in its response to Covid-19 (Coronavirus), we would like to advise applicants that a decision has been taken that all interviews must be conducted in a virtual/remote setting.

In order to facilitate this new way of working, we are asking all applicants to ensure that they have a suitable space to complete the virtual interview as well as a personal device of choice with an account registered to the ‘Zoom’ app by which you can undertake the interview/assessment if selected. We are also asking you to ensure that your personal Wi-Fi/Broadband capacity will be sufficient to carry both audio and video feeds to undertake the interview. This will then ensure that there are no issues incurred during the interview.

Further Information for this job:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Craig Robinson who can be reached at craig.robinson@gov.scot.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the Resourcing Team at recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Assistant Fisheries Scientist, Montrose – closing date 11 November appeared first on Marine Scotland.

New focus for farmed fish group

Fri, 2020-10-30 11:59

The cause of fish mortality, impact of climate change and development of treatments will be the focus for the newly refreshed Farmed Fish Health Framework.

The 10 year framework, which is a collaboration between the aquaculture sector and Scottish Government and its advisers, will now concentrate on areas that make a direct and tangible difference to fish health in Scotland.

The Scottish Government’s Chief Veterinary Officer Dr Sheila Voas will chair a reformatted Steering Group with other stakeholders feeding in their areas of expertise through a new workshop approach.

Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing said:

“I am delighted that Dr Voas has agreed to chair the redesigned Farmed Fish Health Framework Steering Group.

“Sheila is a much respected figure within animal health and is ideally placed to bring a fresh perspective to aquatic animal health, and promote linkages between animal and aquatic health, including the Scottish Animal Welfare Commission.

“The Farmed Fish Health Framework’s focus on fish health and securing a sustainable future for Scotland’s top food export is crucial, and it is ideally placed to contribute to wider work aimed at sustainable economic recovery.

“I would like to thank all involved for their time and efforts to deliver the Farmed Fish Health Framework to date and their continued commitment to improving fish health and welfare in Scotland, ensuring that Scotland continues to set a leading example in this area.”

Background

The new governance and format of the Farmed Fish Health Steering Group was confirmed by Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing.

The Steering Group is expected to include representatives from a range of aquaculture interests with other stakeholders feeding in their areas of expertise through a new workshop approach.

Information on the 10 Year Farmed Fish Health Framework.

The three priority delivery areas for the Group are:

1. Mortality by cause analysis with the associated framework activities to:
  • Develop a consistent reporting methodology for collection of information on the causes of farmed fish mortality over recent years, and
  • Provide survival data for marine rainbow trout and marine salmon and ensure that the Farmed Fish Health Framework activities remain appropriate

2. Climate Change and Ocean Acidification with the associated framework activities to:

  • Consider the creation of real time monitoring of plankton in, and alert of the occurrence of, potentially harmful phytoplankton species
  • Determine how best to measure changing climatic conditions in Scotland particular to aquaculture leading to an annual mapping exercise. This should include an assessment of currently available environmental data from around fish farms, for example real-time temperature data
3. Treatments (including medicines) with the associated framework activities to:
  • Encourage development of new medicines with the aim of increasing treatment flexibility and allowing the potential to explore treatment rotation in Scotland, within environmentally sustainable limits, appropriate use of veterinary medicines through ‘cascade’, and treatment residue containment and neutralization

The post New focus for farmed fish group appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Data Lab MSc Placement Programme – Zooplankton Database

Wed, 2020-10-28 16:01

With the impact of Coronavirus changing the way we work, we take a look into the success of this year’s annual Data Lab MSc Placement Programme in the Office of the Chief Scientific Advisor Marine (OCSAM) while working from home…in Athens.

Each year the Data Lab MSc Placement Programme, a collaboration between The Data Lab, 12 Scottish Universities and OCSAM, provides short term student placements with a focus on applying academic knowledge to industry. This year the programme focused on Marine Scotland’s zooplankton database. Zooplankton is the collective name for organisms drifting in water and usually of microscopic size. Measuring zooplankton populations plays a vital role in the ecosystem and can indicate the onset of environmental changes by drawing links between environmental signals and marine species.

Marine Scotland, in its various guises, has been collecting zooplankton data for over 100 years; the aim of this project was to import the results from 57 surveys into a newly created, central and fit for purpose database.

Georgios Orfanakis, a student studying MSc Data Science at the Robert Gordon University, took up his placement to work alongside OCSAM and Marine Scotland Science (MSS) staff in analytical and data-management roles. The timing meant the placement started as Covid-19 restrictions began to come into effect. With Robert Gordon University moving to online courses Georgios decided to fly to his home in Athens to participate in his placement and study remotely. Communication on this project was vital and Georgios was able to remain connected with OCSAM and MSS with regular video calls. This added a wee extra hurdle of being unable to have face to face meetings and ask any quick questions over the desk.

Despite recent challenges, the outcome of this 12 week project has been a resounding success with more than 215,000 samples and a staggering 18 million results including, species, size and abundance, inputted and readily available.

Speaking about the placement, Georgios Orfanakis said:

“Marine Scotland can now use the database to access data which can be used in their research into the seas around Scotland. Data spanning 30 years can now be retrieved from one source. They will now be able to compare it to older data which they have, because they have data going back to the beginning of the 19th Century.”

Professor Colin Moffat, Chief Scientific Advisor Marine said:

“We are delighted with the results of this project which has seen substantial parts of archive plankton data transferred into a comprehensive database. We will be able to use this to help monitor the status of zooplankton, an absolutely fundamental component of marine food webs, and for research and assessments for years to come.”

MSS will now update the Marine Environmental Data and Information Network (MEDIN) metadata and create new records to fill in the gaps where data may not have previously been available. This database will become an integrated and essential component for research and assessments in the future.

The project has also proven to be mutually very beneficial for Georgios as he has secured himself an analytical role working with Charles River Laboratories.

Background information:

The Data Lab is Scotland’s innovation centre for data and artificial intelligence. Through hubs in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Inverness innovation is fostered through collaboration, building skills, growing talent and championing Scotland’s data science community. The hubs sit within the construction industry, oil and gas, stratified medicine, digital health, industrial bio-tech, and sensors and imaging. This is helping Scotland maximise the value from data and lead the world to a data-powered future, turning knowledge and expertise into commercially viable products for companies to bring benefit to the country’s economy.

Further information:

The post Data Lab MSc Placement Programme – Zooplankton Database appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Physical Oceanographer – closing date 16 November

Tue, 2020-10-27 15:15

We are currently seeking applications for Physical Oceanographer within the Oceanography Group based in Aberdeen. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

This post will be part of the Oceanography Group at Marine Scotland Science in Aberdeen. The Oceanography Group provides oceanographic science support, including hydrodynamic modelling, to the Environment Monitoring and Assessment (EMA) Programme. The group leads on the physical oceanographic aspects of EMA’s integrated monitoring (including long-term monitoring at our coastal stations network and long-term offshore monitoring in the northern North Sea and Faroe Shetland Channel) and provides oceanographic input to cross-cutting projects related to the development and management of the aquaculture industry, studies physical and bio-physical connectivity in the marine and coastal environment (e.g. in the context of marine planning) and supports the sustainable development of the marine renewable energy industry by characterising the physical baseline conditions and assessing the potential effects of energy extraction. The Oceanography Group also works towards an increased level of preparedness in the eventuality of oil spills and marine pollution incidents, mostly by developing and maintaining modelling tools and observational capability.

The Group works consistently across the majority of MSS Science Programmes, providing quality-assured physical environmental data and data products (both observational and model-based), advice and interpretation in critical topics such as climate change, as well as oceanographic services to other Groups and Programmes. This is a specialised post that requires a good understanding of marine physics, the ability to acquire, process and quality-control highly specialised data, competency at high-level programming and a high degree of hands-on knowledge of oceanographic instrumentation, both hardware and software (ideally newer technologies such as real-time monitoring and autonomous systems).

Important Information Regarding Interviews:

In recognition of the Scottish Government’s ongoing measures and guidance in its response to Covid-19 (Coronavirus), we would like to advise applicants that a decision has been taken that all interviews must be conducted in a virtual/remote setting.

In order to facilitate this new way of working, we are asking all applicants to ensure that they have a suitable space to complete the virtual interview. In addition, a personal device of choice, which has the Skype for Business application downloaded. This will allow candidates to undertake the interview/assessment if selected. We are also asking you to ensure that your personal Wi-Fi/Broadband capacity will be sufficient to carry both audio and video feeds.

Further Information for this job:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Jenny Hindson (Jennifer.Hindson@gov.scot) or Alejandro Gallego (Alejandro.Gallego@gov.scot).

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the Resourcing Team via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Physical Oceanographer – closing date 16 November appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Oceanographer – closing date 16 November

Tue, 2020-10-27 15:00

We are currently seeking applications for an Oceanographer within Marine Scotland Science, based in Aberdeen. This is a 18 month fixed term and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The Oceanography and Marine Environmental Assessment Groups in Marine Scotland Science are enhancing their environmental monitoring network by upgrading their tools (e.g. oceanographic buoys with real-time telemetry and chemistry sensors to sample Ocean Acidification) in the context of the INTERREG VA COMPASS project*. The need for this post is the result of this enhanced technical capability in oceanography and chemistry. We need a fixed-term appointment to undertake technical responsibility for new oceanographic and chemical instrumentation (set-up, downloading, communications), as well as data acquisition, processing and quality-assurance, and setting up new procedures to maintain these systems in the future.

Important Information Regarding Interviews:

In recognition of the Scottish Government’s ongoing measures and guidance in its response to Covid-19 (Coronavirus), we would like to advise applicants that a decision has been taken that all interviews must be conducted in a virtual/remote setting.

In order to facilitate this new way of working, we are asking all applicants to ensure that they have a suitable space to complete the virtual interview. In addition, a personal device of choice, which has the Skype for Business application downloaded.  This will allow candidates to undertake the interview/assessment if selected. We are also asking you to ensure that your personal Wi-Fi/Broadband capacity will be sufficient to carry both audio and video feeds.

Further Information for this job:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Jenny Hindson at Jennifer.Hindson@gov.scot or Alejandro Gallego at Alejandro.Gallego@gov.scot.

*This project is match-funded by the EU’s INTERREG VA Programme, managed by the Special EU Programmes Body (SEUPB).

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the resourcing team via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Oceanographer – closing date 16 November appeared first on Marine Scotland.

European Maritime and Fisheries Fund Letter

Thu, 2020-10-22 10:37

Scotland should receive at least £62 million annually in replacement of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) according to Fisheries Secretary Fergus Ewing.

Mr Ewing raised the issue at an EU Exit Operations meeting last week and has now written to Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, George Eustice, seeking much needed clarity on UK Government funding for this vital sector from 01 January 2021.

In addition to Brexit, Scotland’s seafood sector has been hard hit by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic with the loss of export and food service markets.  The new funding is also key to supporting recovery for coastal communities and protecting jobs.

Full text of the letter below.

 

Dear George,

I am writing to you today to seek urgent clarification on the replacement for the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) which I again raised at the EU Exit Operations Committee on Tuesday. As you understand, this funding is vital to Scotland’s marine industries, its environment and it coastal communities. Despite many attempts by Scottish Government officials to clarify with HM Treasury, the level of funding being made available and the timescale for availability, no clarification has been forthcoming.

As you will be aware I have consistently highlighted that the previous allocation of available EU funding has been insufficient for Scotland’s needs. The allocation the UK sought in 2016 did not recognise the importance of the marine environment in Scotland or the opportunities it represents. In discussions with Defra officials on the replacement for the EMFF, the case for a significant uplift has been clearly set out , given that Scotland has some 14% of EU aquaculture production, 9% of EU sea fisheries landings and 10.9% of European sea area to manage. The marine economy in Scotland, and the rest of the UK, has the potential to provide vital, well paid, skilled jobs in rural locations and to support sustainable supply chains across the country and further afield. Market failures stand in the way of this naturally occurring. As one example, there are approximately 260 ports and harbours around Scotland, 90 of which serve the commercial fishing industry alongside a host of other users. Many of these were built in the 1800s and early 1900s and are becoming unfit for purpose, without substantial investment the potential growth in the marine economy will not be realised.

Scotland would therefore anticipate any domestic replacement funding to reflect this importance and we had identified that we are seeking an allocation to replace the EMFF of £62m per annum. Additionally given that the EU have increased the available funding for the new EMFF by €500m, even on the value of sea fisheries landing in Scotland alone, based on the new EMFF budget for the 2021-2027 period, 9% would equate to £70m per annum.

As I have also highlighted consistently, the loss of EU funding comes at a time when the biggest risk to Scotland’s seafood industry is the UK Government’s Brexit proposals. The harm Brexit will impose on the people and economy of Scotland must be minimised as far as possible. The alternative is to see our seafood industries facing potentially crippling delays and additional costs, which could prove devastating for jobs and exports and have wider repercussions for the marine sectors and the fragile communities which rely on these sectors. If we had remained as EU members the replacement for the EMFF would have been available from the start of January 2021. Given the UK Governments commitments in respect of EU funding it is therefore vitally important that the option is also available to support the seafood sector from the start of January 2021.

I look forward to confirmation of the required allocation of funding to replace EMFF in Scotland and the opportunity to provide support from the start of January 2021.

Yours sincerely,

FERGUS EWING

The post European Maritime and Fisheries Fund Letter appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: International Fisheries – Policy Manager (2 posts) – closing date 5 November

Thu, 2020-10-15 09:00

We are currently seeking applications for an International Fisheries – Policy Manager (2 posts)within the Marine Scotland in Edinburgh. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

Sea Fisheries is an important area of Scottish Government policy, balancing support for fishermen, whilst ensuring sustainable fishing practices in the long term. The International Fisheries team plays a key role in achieving these policy goals, delivering significant and high-profile objectives for Ministers.

The team actively engages in fisheries negotiations with the EU and non-EU countries to establish fishing opportunities for the Scottish fleet. Our negotiating strategy and priorities are influenced by high quality science and take into account wider policy objectives, including socio-economic implications. It is important to work within environmental limits, making sure fish stocks are managed sustainably, in turn providing a resource for future generations and safeguarding the diversity of the ecosystem.

In order to achieve this we work closely with scientific and economic advisors, and a range of stakeholders including industry representatives and environmental NGOs to develop Scotland’s negotiating position. In addition, the team engages on a continuous basis on wider fisheries management and conservation policy matters.

With the UK’s exit from the EU on 31st January, and subsequent move to full Coastal State status from 2021, Scotland’s role at negotiations will become ever more vital. To facilitate our increasing presence on the international stage, the International Fisheries team is split into two separate branches – one focussing primarily on pelagic stocks and the other primarily on demersal stocks. However, both branches remain closely aligned, contributing to a number of shared functions.

Each branch comprises a C1, a B3 (these posts) and 2 B2s (which these posts will manage). The posts are based in Victoria Quay, but will involve significant travel within Scotland, the UK and internationally. It should also be noted that during live negotiations the team is required to work flexibility and often out of core hours.

Important Information Regarding Interviews:

In recognition of the Scottish Government’s ongoing measures and guidance in its response to Covid-19 (Coronavirus), we would like to advise applicants that a decision has been taken that all interviews must be conducted in a virtual/remote setting.

In order to facilitate this new way of working, we are asking all applicants to ensure that they have a suitable space to complete the virtual interview. In addition, a personal device of choice, which has the Skype for Business application downloaded.  This will allow candidates to undertake the interview/assessment if selected. We are also asking you to ensure that your personal Wi-Fi/Broadband capacity will be sufficient to carry both audio and video feeds.

Further Information:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Lauren Ferrari at lauren.ferrari@gov.scot.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the resourcing team via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: International Fisheries – Policy Manager (2 posts) – closing date 5 November appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Pages