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Updated: 1 hour 17 min ago

Vacancy: Senior Marine Ornithologist, closing date 10 March

Fri, 2020-02-14 10:00

Salary: £37418 – £45241
Location: Aberdeen/Edinburgh
Hours: Around 37.00 per week
Closing Date: 10 March 2020 at midnight
Reference: IRC81300E

We are currently seeking applications for a Senior Marine Ornithologist within Marine Scotland based in Aberdeen or Edinburgh. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The post-holder will work in the Renewable Energy Environmental Advice (REEA) group at Marine Scotland Science (MSS) to contribute to achieving Scottish Government goals for marine renewable energy and for protecting the marine environment.

The post provides specialist advice on marine birds to Marine Scotland Licensing Operations Team (MS-LOT) to support the assessment of environmental impacts of marine renewable and construction developments, and the provision of advice to Marine Scotland’s Policy and Planning Division (MPPD) in support of renewable energy policy, marine environment policy and on Marine Protected Areas (including Special Protection Areas). The advice provided is placed into the context of the interactions of marine bird populations and licenced marine activities, and the legislation and regulatory processes that are relevant to marine birds in Scotland.

The successful candidate will be expected to work independently, coordinate their work programme with the existing B3 Senior Ornithologist and other staff within REEA, and gain input from more senior staff where appropriate e.g. when critical issues have been identified and for QA.

To underpin the advice provided, they must ensure that they are familiar with the best available science through maintaining a working knowledge of best practice and detailed knowledge of marine bird ecology.

Qualifications Required:

Post-graduate degree in a relevant biology subject or equivalent experience such as successfully delivering similar duties to those required of the Senior Marine Ornithologist post holder, or relevant research on seabirds.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

Essential Criteria:

1. A good understanding of seabird biology and regulation, legislation and research relating to marine birds in Scottish and European waters. Including a good understanding of ornithology assessment tools used in environmental assessments for collision risk modelling, displacement assessment, and population viability analyses.
2. Demonstrable data analysis and statistical skills, using specialist statistical software, such as R or Matlab.
3. The ability to work independently with good organisational skills and the ability to prioritise workload.
4. Excellent written and oral communication skills, including the ability to explain scientific concepts to varied audiences, maintain good working relationships and proactively support colleagues.

Further Information:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants“. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Jared Wilson who can be reached on jared.wilson@gov.scot.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact HR Resourcing on 0131 244 8500 or via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Senior Marine Ornithologist, closing date 10 March appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Marine Mammal Biologist, closing date 5 March

Thu, 2020-02-13 09:00

Salary: £29759 – £34087
Location: Aberdeen
Hours: Around 37.00 per week
Closing Date: 5 March 2020 at midnight
Reference: IRC81419E

We are currently seeking applications for a Marine Mammal Biologist within the Directorate for Marine Scotland Science (MSS) based in Aberdeen. This is a 12 month fixed term and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The post-holder will work alongside the REEA staff at MSS to contribute to achieving Scottish Government goals for marine renewable energy and for protecting the marine environment. This will be achieved through contributing to the provision of advice to MS-LOT on interactions between marine mammals and the emerging marine renewable energy industries, and to MSPPD on marine mammal conservation issues. The post will also contribute to ongoing marine mammal research projects that involve the collection, processing and analyses of acoustic data. These activities will be placed into the context of the interactions of marine mammal populations and anthropogenic activities, and of the legislation that is relevant to marine mammals in Scotland.

To underpin advice, the post-holder will help to ensure that the best available science is incorporated into MSS activities and outputs. This will include the evaluation of the applicability of new methodologies relevant to marine mammals, and contributing to the commissioning and management of external research contracts.

The post-holder will need to be able to maintain and develop productive networks with relevant staff in external organisations, including SNH, JNCC, and academia. These networks will enable the post-holder to understand major developments in the scientific field, but there will also be a requirement to ensure that they continue to develop their skills and knowledge through understanding the relevant literature and continuous professional development. This will be a varied and interesting post in a highly applied scientific field, which will be suited to someone who enjoys a high level of autonomy and has the ability to successfully handle competing priorities.

 

Qualifications Required:

For jobs in Band B & C you must hold a minimum of 3 Highers or equivalent.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

 

Essential Criteria:

1. A good understanding of marine mammal biology.
2. Demonstrable data analysis and statistical skills, using specialist statistical software, such as R or Matlab.
3. The ability to work independently with good organisational skills and effectively manage projects.
4. Demonstrable experience of collecting, processing, analysing, and reporting on marine mammal passive acoustic or distribution, abundance of behavioural data.

 

Further Information:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification“. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Ross Culloch by email or at 0131 244 3749.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact Emma Crawford on 0131 244 5656 or via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Marine Mammal Biologist, closing date 5 March appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Testing technology in the fishing sector

Wed, 2020-02-12 09:42

An international research project that is developing, testing and promoting new technology systems in the fishing sector is being trialled in Scottish waters by Marine Scotland scientists.

Now in its third year, the Smartfish H2020 project, which is funded through the EU’s Horizon 2020 fund and coordinated by the Norwegian research institute SINTEF Ocean, will be testing automated technologies that recognise, identify and counts fish in video footage from cameras on fishing boats.

Smartfish H2020 partners will discuss priorities for the third year of work, including how Marine Scotland plans on testing the technology in Scotland over the next two years, at a meeting in Aberdeen February 11 – 13.

Alongside this work to recognise, identify and count fish in video footage from cameras, Marine Scotland scientists have also been investigating the effects of light on the behaviour of different species of fish.

The Computer Vision System automatically identifying some whiting as they pass along a conveyor belt.

By steering them into different parts of the net, the fish may encounter other measures like ‘square mesh panels’ or sorting grids which can help smaller fish or less desirable species to escape.

Dr Coby Needle, Chief Fisheries Advisor for Scotland said:

“Over the last ten years Marine Scotland has been a leader in the field of using machine learning to recognise, identify and count fish in video footage from cameras.

“Using computers to automate the process in this way is a great step forward as it is quite a time consuming task for staff to go through and review videos manually.

“By using cameras we have to send fewer staff to sea on fishing vessels, which saves money and exposes them to less risk.”

Smartfish H2020

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International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Tue, 2020-02-11 09:00

International Day of Women and Girls in Science is an opportunity for us to put the spotlight on some of the great work that’s going on in Marine Scotland Science.

This year’s big day also marks the first since we were awarded the Bronze Award by the Athena SWAN Charter as part of our work to tackle gender inequalities in science and engineering.

The Award recognises work undertaken to address gender equality in Higher Education and Research Institutes.

Dr Carey Fraser who leads on diversity and inclusion within Marine Scotland Science said:

“It is clear that more diverse teams perform better and produce better science. The science in Marine Scotland provides key evidence, information and functions for Scottish Government.

“There is an incredibly wide range of scientific work here that requires many STEM disciplines to sample, analyse and research our seas and rivers, and the habitats, animals and plants within them. We need a diverse range of skills and people to work on research vessel surveys, at rivers, and in our laboratories, to carry out the detailed biological, chemical, physical and mathematical analysis of samples and data that provides information of international significance with direct impact on marine management in Scotland and globally.”Berit Rabe_Scotia trip

Dr Berit Rabe is a physical oceanographer who has been working in Marine Scotland for around nine and a half years.

She works with oceanographic field data and hydrodynamic model outputs to understand the dynamics and circulations of sea lochs and the coastal regions around Scotland and to investigate sea lice dispersal.  She said:

“One of my proudest moments was becoming the designated female Scientist in Charge (SiC) for the December hydrographic research cruise to the northern North Sea and the Faroe-Shetland-Channel. This involves organising logistics before and after the cruise, ensuring we are achieving our scientific objectives, and leading the scientists at sea. I’ve enjoyed this role so much I’ve now been SiC taken on this role six times.

“It’s also been really incredible to be part of the team that achieved the Athena SWAN Bronze Award. Before the Athena SWAN Working Group was established there was no clear official route for staff to take on the role as SiC or gain experience to help them progress. Now I am helping to implement a process for training and progression that is assisting junior staff members, regardless of gender, to gain the experience they need to progress in their scientific discipline.”

Dr Faye Jackson has been working for Marine Scotland Science for nearly two years after being based at the Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory in Pitlochry during her PhD.

Her work is focused on understanding and predicting river temperature to identify where our famous salmon rivers are at risk due to climate change and developing tools and advice to support management decisions.  She said:

“Working at the Freshwater Fisheries Lab is a really interesting job, I’m constantly learning and looking for ways to take what can be a complicated story and distil it down to something that is accessible to people. It involves such a broad range of skills – analysing complicated data, making maps and making visual summaries which can then help river managers and others make decisions.  One of the benefits of being a scientist in the Scottish Government is getting to work on large scale projects that do have a genuine impact and have wider policy implications. With increases in river temperatures as a result of climate change, work which can underpin evidence-based management of the freshwater environment and protect iconic fish like salmon is even more crucial.”

More reading:

Dr Jessica Craig – Fisheries Population Modeller
Dr Berit Rabe – Physical Oceanographer
Pam Walsham -Senior Environmental Chemist 
Dr Faye Jackson – Salmon Assessment Modeller
Dr Rebecca Langton – Species Distribution Modeller

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