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Updated: 2 hours 53 min ago

Joint Warrior Training Activity: 24th April – 4 May 2018

Thu, 2018-04-19 10:08

Joint Warrior

Exercise Joint Warrior (JW), organised by the Ministry of Defence, is part of a major programme of exercises involving land forces, warships, submarines and aircraft from all the NATO partners, across the UK. The next exercise, Joint Warrior 181, will take place between 24 April and 4 May 2018, mostly near Cape Wrath (live firing) and down the west coast of Scotland (submarine, warship activity and mine warfare).

During 2018 there will be only this one exercise. The autumn session is being replaced this year by a larger exercise in Norway.

Further Information

 

 

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Vacancy: EU Exit Legislation Programme Manager (closing date 1 May 2018)

Tue, 2018-04-17 15:00

We are currently seeking applications for a Legislation Programme Manager within Marine Scotland based in Edinburgh. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

Overview:
One of the Scottish Government’s key priorities at present is to support Scottish Ministers to protect Scotland’s Place in Europe, and to plan for protecting and promoting Scotland’s marine interests.  A UK exit from the EU will have a significant legislative impact on the work of Marine Scotland with the vast majority of our legislation and regulatory framework deriving from EU requirements. The Directorate therefore needs to ensure that planning and preparation are in place to ensure the necessary transfer of the EU’s legislative framework arising from the UK’s exit from the EU.

Qualification Required:
You should have, or be expected to obtain, one of the following:

  • A minimum of a 2:2 degree in a legal discipline or equivalent politics, economics or environmental studies.
  • A Masters Degree which contains a high level of environmental legal or policy analysis.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

Essential Criteria:

  1. Excellent people skills and an ability to build relationships with people and to make connections at all levels across different organisations.
  2. A strong understanding of legislative issues as they apply to Scotland, including experience working with, and analysing, primary and secondary legislation. The ability to think strategically and creatively to develop and implement policy and legal solutions effectively within the wider strategic context.
  3. Excellent oral and written communication skills including in order to provide clear and concise advice and briefing to Scottish Ministers and senior officials.
  4. Proven ability of managing numerous competing priorities in a fast-paced environment and ability to work flexibly.

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Caro Cowan or telephone 0131 244 48432.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact Helen McLean on telephone 0131 244 8217.

Further Information:

 

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How the HoTRiverS Project is helping us to understand and protect Scotland’s rivers

Tue, 2018-04-17 10:00

3D ‘structure-from-motion’ map of Girnock Burn showing forest cover

One of the ways in which climate change is likely to impact Scotland’s rivers is through an increase in water temperature, particularly during summer months. Stream temperature is of great importance to the growth and survival of a range of iconic fish species like Atlantic salmon and Brown trout, which are relatively intolerant of high temperature. Hence, there are concerns that elevated stream temperature could alter the thermal suitability of Scotland’s rivers to a range of native freshwater species. As a result, researchers at Marine Scotland Science (MSS) and the University of Birmingham (UoB) have collaborated on a number of projects to better understand stream temperature patterns in Scotland’s rivers and identify strategies for reducing the impacts of climate change on stream temperature. One of these collaborations, the EU-funded HoTRiverS project (Heterogeneity of Temperature in Rivers and Streams), is demonstrating how cutting-edge technology can inform river management and policy in the fight against climate change.

River managers across the UK are planting trees to shade rivers during the warmest parts of the day. However, if we want to improve our understanding of the role of trees in reducing stream temperature, we need to be better able to characterise both tree cover and the effects of river bankside shading. This information can be difficult or costly to obtain, especially in remote locations. To address this key research problem, the HoTRiverS project team developed a novel based methodology to simulate the impacts of bankside tree shading on stream temperature. During summer 2017, they used a drone (a small unmanned quadcopter equipped with a high-resolution camera) to obtain high resolution aerial photography of Girnock Burn, a tributary of the Aberdeenshire River Dee where Marine Scotland has monitored salmon populations for more than 50 years.). Using a technique called ‘structure-from-motion photogrammetry’, which enables the extraction of 3D data from 2D photos (in much the same way as stereo vision allows humans to perceive depth), they were able to generate a highly accurate 3D map of tree heights in the lower Girnock Burn (see picture at the top of this article).

Impact of bankside tree shading

 

By inputting the resulting tree height data into a computer model that simulates the impacts of tree shading on stream temperature, the new methodology clearly highlights the extent to which tree shading reduces stream temperature in the lower Girnock Burn (see graph above). This new low-cost, high-accuracy technique has the potential to improve our understanding about how and where tree shading produces optimal stream temperature reductions. By applying the drone-based methodology to other locations in Scotland and across the UK, it is hoped that this research will furnish river scientists and managers with the information necessary to understand the effects of woodland in different geographical locations. Based on this information, new tools can be developed to target planting to locations where it will have the greatest benefits in reducing the effects of climate change.

Thermal image mosaic of Baddoch Burn showing variation in water surface temperature

Furthermore, the HoTRiverS project is highlighting other ways in which drone technology can help scientists to better understand stream temperature patterns. Previous research has shown how airborne thermal infrared (TIR) river surveys can be used to identify important cool-water habitats used by salmon and trout during summer high temperature. However, TIR survey flights using conventional aircraft are very costly meaning that the location of these critical habitats often remains unknown. In order to try and resolve this issue, the HoTRiverS research team used a drone equipped with a miniaturised thermal infrared imaging camera to map surface water temperature patterns in Baddoch Burn, another salmon monitoring tributary in the Aberdeenshire Dee catchment, as illustrated above.

Although the analysis of these data is ongoing, early indications are that the drone-based thermal imaging data will be useful for detecting small-scale variations in surface water temperature that are of key importance to fish and other species.

This detailed spatial data on river temperature has been supplemented with observations obtained from in-situ temperature dataloggers and automated weather stations (pictured above) to characterise microclimate and heat exchange processes. By coupling these datasets, it will be possible to develop a high resolution computer model capable of characterising the physical processes (ie. solar radiation, evaporation, groundwater inputs) that drive observed stream temperature patterns in the burn.

In the future, this model will help us to understand and predict how future climate and land-use changes might impact stream temperature in Baddoch Burn. This collaboration between MSS and UoB demonstrates how advances in geospatial technology and computer modelling are helping to better understand and protect Scotland’s freshwater environments. Through the results of these cutting-edge research projects, it is hoped that we will arrive at a better understanding of the interactions between the landscape features, climate change and river temperature with a view to preserving Scotland’s valuable rivers and fish populations for future generations.

Dr. Steve Dugdale

Dr. Iain Malcolm

Prof. David Hannah

Further information:

Recent/related publications:

Dugdale, S.J., Malcolm, I.A., Kantola, K., & Hannah, D.M. (2018). Stream temperature under contrasting riparian forest cover: Understanding thermal dynamics and heat exchange processes. Science of The Total Environment, 610–611, 1375-1389

Jackson, F.L., Fryer, R.J., Hannah, D.M., Millar, C.P., & Malcolm, I.A. (2018). A spatio-temporal statistical model of maximum daily river temperatures to inform the management of Scotland’s Atlantic salmon rivers under climate change. Science of The Total Environment, 612, 1543-1558

Dugdale, S.J., Hannah, D.M., & Malcolm, I.A. (2017). River temperature modelling: A review of process-based approaches and future directions. Earth-Science Reviews, 175, 97-113

Jackson, F.L., Hannah, D.M., Fryer, R.J., Millar, C.P., & Malcolm, I.A. (2017). Development of spatial regression models for predicting summer river temperatures from landscape characteristics: Implications for land and fisheries management. Hydrological Processes, 31, 1225-1238

Garner, G., Malcolm, I.A., Sadler, J.P., & Hannah, D.M. (2014). What causes cooling water temperature gradients in a forested stream reach? Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 5361-5376

Garner, G., Malcolm, I.A., Sadler, J.P., & Hannah, D.M. (2017). The role of riparian vegetation density, channel orientation and water velocity in determining river temperature dynamics. Journal of Hydrology, 553

 

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Twinkle twinkle little starfish

Thu, 2018-04-12 10:00

Survey: 0518A

Duration: 14 April – 2 May 2018

Gear: Scallop dredges

Objectives

  1. To carry out a survey of scallop stocks on the West Coast.
  2. To age, measure and assess shell damage on all scallops caught.
  3. To Identify and sample additional areas of commercial interest to the scallop fishery.
  4. To collect information on by-catch of other commercial fish and shellfish species.
  5. To identify, quantify numbers, and damage assess of starfish species in all dredge tows.
  6. To collect frozen whole scallops for heavy metal testing as part of the OSPAR assessment of hazardous substances in the marine environment.
  7. To undertake underwater filming trials using a Go-pro camera in sheltered areas.

The survey will depart on 14 April and will make passage for the west coast stations on the survey plan.

Scallop dredge hauls will be made at sites used on previous surveys as shown on the map below. Hauls will be of 30 minutes duration. In addition to the historical tows, additional tows will be done in the Clyde if time permits. From each haul, all of the scallops will be measured to the half centimeter below and aged. Numbers and size distribution of commercial fish and shellfish species will be recorded along with scallop shell damage, starfish numbers and species. Tissue samples will also be collected from selected sites and frozen for heavy metal analysis back at the laboratory.

Further Information:

Scallop dredge sites

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Celebrating the Year of the Engineer – Meet Bill Leiper

Tue, 2018-04-10 10:00

Bill aboard the RRS Challenger

As we mentioned in our blog in January, 2018 is the Year of the Engineer as well as the Year of the Young Person. Over the course of the year, we’ll be introducing you to some of our incredibly talented engineers, as well as showing your some of their work. Next up, we hear from our Net Store Manager, Bill.

Who are you and what do you do?

I’m Bill Leiper – the Net Store Manager at the Marine Lab in Aberdeen (the one in the yellow hard hat!).

Why is what you do important?

We are the last remaining net store in Aberdeen, a city once buoyed by a vibrant fishing industry. They are very few skilled and experienced net menders and riggers left in the North East, let alone Aberdeen.  From our in-house, purpose built net store, we provide a highly professional and particular service to, principally, the science sector.  A large part of the work is dedicated to the numerous and wide-ranging fishing surveys that take place throughout the year.  We make, mend and repair a large variety of nets and dredges in addition to supplying and servicing all the associated gear that accompanies this.  Driven, in part by ICES, we work to our own exacting specialised standards.  We regularly make and supply a diverse range of moorings for different departments in the lab.  If any of this afore mentioned work was to be outsourced and completed externally, the cost would very quickly become staggering.

What’s your career path been – how did you get here?

I’m a Torry lad who grew up near the lab. Like a few of my pals at the time, I was distracted in school.  We were sent en masse to trawling school, as was standard in those days.  Before finishing my first week there, my class was asked “Does anyone fancy an apprenticeship as a net rigger?”.  Two of us raised our hands.  I was quicker.  Two weeks later  I started in the lab, on the 6th of January 1976.  Four years later I was given a hand written piece of paper.  It signified the completion of my apprenticeship. I still have this original letter at home somewhere.

What’s your proudest achievement so far?

Net storeIn a work sense I have always and still take great pride and pleasure in teaching new skills to those willing to learn.

Although I am now based almost entirely in the lab, I used to spend a bit of time at sea. One trip of note came about after the Braer ran aground off Shetland in 1993.  I was tasked to accompany the Merchant Navy crewed vessel Challenger (Charter) to the site of the spill to conduct fishing operations to monitor contamination.  We fished with a beam trawl on a single wire and, as the only person aboard with any fishing knowledge, I came to effectively command the operations of the vessel. A four day trip very quickly turned into 24 days.  I think I earned at least a stripe.

What would you say to any aspiring young engineers?

Probably unsurprisingly, listen and learn. Stick in and do your best but if you’ve found something you love to do then this will come naturally and without hassle.

Why, in your opinion, do you think outreach is important/why do you do it?

Outreach broadens the mind. It casts the net and gives people an opportunity to consider things they otherwise may not have.

I particularly enjoy seeing the excitement and enthusiasm of primary school kids when they come to learn about what I do. Unlike the often disgruntled and disinterested teens, they are keen to ask countless questions.  The net store is a compulsory stop on the show and tell tours.

And one fun fact about you?

I know quite a lot about Torry. I know that there are two Aitkens bakery shops in Torry.  I love paradise slices from Aitkens.

The post Celebrating the Year of the Engineer – Meet Bill Leiper appeared first on Marine Scotland.

What’s your anglerfish?

Thu, 2018-04-05 15:21

Survey: 0218H – MFV Genesis BF505

Duration: 6-20 April 2018

Fishing Gear: Anglerfish Trawl BT 195

Objectives

  1. To undertake a nationally co-ordinated demersal trawling survey of Anglerfish (Lophius piscatorius and Lophius budegassa) in the Northern North Sea, ICES area IVa.
  2. To record and map distributions of Megrim (Lepidorhombus wiffiagonis), Four-Spot Megrim (Lepidorhombus boscii) Cod (Gadus morhua), Blue Skate (Dipturus cf. flossada) and Flapper Skate (Dipturus cf. intermedia).
  3. To collect biological data on Anglerfish species, Cod, Megrim, Four-Spot Megrim, Blue Skate and Flapper Skate.

Procedures

This trawl survey follows a set of protocols drawn up by an industry science survey planning group made up of Marine Scotland scientists and fishing representatives. These protocols share much in common with the sampling regimes described in Marine Scotland standing instructions for demersal trawl surveys.

Trawling

One haul of 60 minutes duration will be made at each sampling station; trawling operations will occur in waters up to a maximum of 1000 m. Daily starting times will be 06:00 hours and all trawling should be complete by approximately 23:30 hours each night.  The Scanmar system will be used to monitor wing spread, door spread and distance covered during each haul.  A bottom contact sensor will be mounted on the footrope.

Catches will be worked up according to the protocols for Marine Scotland Anglerfish surveys which are similar in principle to Marine Scotland standing instructions.

Further information

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Vacancy: Fisheries Population Modeller (Maternity Cover) (Closing date – 13 April 2018)

Thu, 2018-04-05 10:00
We are currently seeking applications for a Fisheries Population Modeller  within Marine Scotland Science Sea Fisheries Programme based in Aberdeen. This is a 12 month fixed term and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

Marine Scotland Science’s Sea Fisheries Programme works in a cross-cutting structure to provide scientific advice to the Scottish Government and international partners on the management of Scotland’s marine resources. This involves ecosystem monitoring and the assessment of the fish and shellfish stocks of interest to Scotland, activities which are underpinned by a programme of research. This post is based in the Stock and Fishery Science Group which is involved in the collection and use of fisheries data contributing towards stock assessments and fisheries management. Qualifications Required
For jobs in Band B and C, you must hold a minimum of 3 SCE Higher qualifications Grades
A-C).

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact the Resourcing Officer named at the end of this advert to discuss.

Essential Criteria
1. Excellent computational skills, with proven ability to programme in R software to: manage and quality check data and undertake statistical analysis.
2. Good written and oral communication skills – experience of giving presentations, preparing reports and/or publications.
3. Good organisational skills, attention to detail, the ability to plan and prioritise work and use your own initiative.
4. Relevant research experience in the use of models of population dynamics. For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Nabeil Salama  who can be reached at nabeil.salama@gov.scot or 0131 244 3205.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact recruitment@gov.scot or on 0131 244 8217.  Further information for this job

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Vacancy: Project Manager – Property and Facilities (closing date 16 April 2018)

Tue, 2018-04-03 11:05

We are currently seeking applications for a C1 Project Manager – Facilities and Property within Marine Scotland based in Aberdeen. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

Marine Scotland (MS) is the Scottish Government’s (SG) marine management Directorate and is recruiting an exciting new project manager post which will lead on a strategic facilities project shaping the organisation for the future.  The project will include exploring co-location with other organisations and embrace the current SG initiatives including the Smarter Workplaces Programme.

Qualifications Required
For jobs in Bands B and C, you must hold a minimum of 3 SCE Higher qualifications (grades A-C).

A facilities management related  professional qualification, preferably educated to degree level and be affiliated to a recognised professional body such as The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), British Institute of Facilities Managers (BIFM) or equivalent. You will be able to demonstrate your professional expertise and current up to date Continuing Professional Development.

Essential Criteria
1. Track record in successful delivery of complex facilities or property projects utilising relevant project and programme management tools and techniques together with experience in writing compliant business cases;
2. Proven leadership, communication and interpersonal skills, particularly with regard to delivering across organisational boundaries resulting in business improvement;
3. Ability to collect, collate and analyse information from a variety of sources and draw out key messages understanding how they link to the key deliverable for the project and wider SG outcomes whilst having the ability to develop and communicate these clearly and succinctly;
4. Be able to engage effectively with a wide range of internal and external stakeholders, often with conflicting or challenging views, and manage these relationships successfully and sensitively ensuring you employ effective change management principles and methodologies.

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Stuart MacDonald  on 0131 244 2639  or at stuart.macdonald@gov.scot.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact recruitment on 0131 244 8217 or by email recruitment@gov.scot

 Further information

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Vacancy – Marine Ornithologist

Fri, 2018-03-30 10:00

We are currently seeking applications for a Marine Ornithologist within Marine Scotland Science based in Aberdeen. This is fixed term appointment and pensionable appointment until 31st March 2022 and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

You will work within the INTERREG VA funded MarPAMM project focussing on delivery of the work package titled “Seabird Monitoring”. This will deliver seabird population viability analyses and pressure mapping, and expert input into: development of the seabird census; monitoring and tracking tender specifications; provision of access to Vessel Management System (VMS) data to project partners; writing of technical and non-technical reports; dissemination of project methods and findings to relevant industry, policy and technical stakeholders; and participation in contract steering groups. The post holder will be required to work collaboratively with other institutions, requiring a strong outward focus, excellent communication skills, travel within the UK and overseas, and an ability to work well with a range of different colleagues.

Qualifications Required:
You will be expected to hold a relevant university degree. Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact the Resourcing Officer named at the end of this advert to discuss.

Essential Criteria:

  1. A good understanding of seabird biology including undertaking seabird monitoring or tracking fieldwork.
  2. Demonstrable data analysis and statistical skills, including use of specialist statistical software, such as R.
  3. The ability to work independently with good organisational skills and effectively manage projects.
  4. Excellent written and oral communication skills, with the ability to explain scientific concepts to varied audiences.

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the ‘Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants’ which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Finlay Bennet who can be reached at finlay.bennet@gov.scot or 0131 244 2647.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact Angela McLachlan on 0131 244 4682 or angela.mclachlan@gov.scot .

Further Information:

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Celebrating our Most Excellent Colleague

Thu, 2018-03-29 11:22

Last week a number of us congregated in our Lecture Theatre to celebrate our colleague Dr Ian Davies receiving his very well deserved MBE. The MBE, or Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, is an award that recognises and rewards contributions to the arts, sciences, charity and welfare organisations and Dr Davies has certainly done that.

Ian Davies and group in Lecture Theatre

Dr Davies received his award for services to marine science, and to the voluntary sector at home and abroad. Explaining some of the background to the award Professor Colin Moffat, Head of Science and person responsible for nominating Dr Davies said: “Ian has contributed hugely to both aquaculture and marine renewable energy in Scotland over the years. With his wife Ruth, they founded a charity, Riverside Trust, and have run it together for more than 20 years. During this time, the charity has provided literature, community care, and community development in Romania, particularly with young people and young cancer patients. He is passionate about his work; both in marine science and his charity and we are very proud of his achievements”.

Speaking to Dr Davies, we asked how he felt about receiving the award and what projects he had in the pipeline. Dr Davies replied that he was “astonished” to find that he had been nominated for the honour but felt “very proud and delighted” too. Some projects he has been involved in, through the charity, have supported children’s camps in Romania, South Africa and Angola; training and development programmes; and construction and community restoration activities in Romania. Future work is likely to continue in the cancer hospital, a drug prevention charity, and running summer camps for village children.

Dr Davies was invited to Buckingham Palace to receive his award, earlier last week, where he was formally presented his award by Prince William. Here he is pictured with his wife Ruth, elder daughter Helen and youngest son Paul.Ian Davies with Ruth Helen and Paul

Congratulations and well done Dr Ian Davies and good luck with all your future projects!

Further Information:

Riverside Trust
Marine Scotland Science
Renewables Programme Topic Sheet
List of 2018 Honours

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