Marine Scotland Blog

Subscribe to Marine Scotland Blog feed Marine Scotland Blog
Scottish Government Blog
Updated: 29 min 53 sec ago

Demersal Trawling with the Scotia

14 hours 9 min ago

MRV Scotia Programme
Survey: 0320S
Duration: 16 February – 9 March 2020

Objectives:
  1. Demersal trawling survey of the grounds off the north and west of Scotland in ICES Subarea 6a.
  2. Obtain temperature and salinity data from the surface and seabed at each trawling station.
  3. Collect additional biological data in connection with the EU Data Collection Framework (DCF).
  4. Retrieval and re-deployment of COMPASS moorings located at discrete sites within the survey area.
Procedures:

General: A training haul will be undertaken during the passage north to ensure all fishing gear/sensors are working effectively. Scotia will then commence fishing operations the next morning on predefined stations off the north Scottish coast and west of 4’W with weather conditions thereafter determining the route taken on the survey.

Trawling: This is a random-stratified survey design with trawl stations being distributed within 10 predefined strata that cover ICES subarea 6A (see figure 1). A total of 62 primary and 45 secondary stations have been generated. The intention is for the 62 trawls to be undertaken on suitable ground as near to the primary station as is practicable.

Hauls will be of 30 minutes duration unless circumstances dictate otherwise. Where possible, fishing operations will be restricted to daylight hours. In addition to the routine sampling, biological data and samples will be collected for target species in line with the EU data regulation and other external projects.

Hydrography: A Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) cast will be taken at each trawl station, weather permitting. Top and bottom temperatures will be reported and in addition, a calibration sample will be retained from the surface.

Compass Moorings: Six acoustic moorings were deployed at sites within the 0320S survey area during the second half of 2019. Two days have been allocated from this survey in order to retrieve and redeploy these.

An acoustic release system will be deployed from the vessel to trigger each mooring; this allows the mooring to surface, where it can be retrieved then re-deployed again.

Figure 2 0320S

Figure 2: 0320S – Location of Compass moorings

Figure 1 0320S

Figure 1. 0320S (SCOWCGFS-Q1) – 2020 ICES Subarea 6a Survey Strata showing primary (bold face) and secondary trawling stations (red dot – plain face).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further Information:

The post Demersal Trawling with the Scotia appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Smartfish H2020 collaborations

Fri, 2020-02-14 16:31

The third annual meeting of the EU H2020 SmartFish project has concluded in Aberdeen.

As highlighted in an earlier blog, SmartFish is an important collaborative four-year project on fishing technology, led by SINTEF (Norway) and featuring key contributions from Marine Scotland Science. The third annual project meeting was held 11-13 February in the Sir Ian Wood Building, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, and was attended by 41 scientists from six countries.

The three days of the meeting were organised thematically, with day one focussing on summaries of project progress, day two continuing with this but adding a vital session on Intellectual Property Rights (essential in a multinational project), and day three featuring further round-ups and planning for the next year of work.

Continued involvement in EU projects of this kind remains very important for Marine Scotland Science, and the welcoming address by Dr Coby Needle, Chief Fisheries Advisor for Scotland, emphasised this.

Reflecting on the meeting he said:

“We extended a warm welcome to our visitors to Aberdeen, on the coldest week of the winter so far, and I was very happy to be able to say that we are continuing to work with European partners on work of critical value to the people of Scotland.

“The principles of innovation underpinning the project remain core to us, and we will remain part of all EU Horizon 2020 projects under the same conditions as pertained prior to the UK leaving the EU. This particular project is led by Norway, a non-EU country, and of the 41 participants in the meeting, 29 were from non-EU countries. Fish aren’t constrained by geographical boundaries, and important fisheries science such as this should be similarly unfettered.

“Our hosts at the Robert Gordon University were very accommodating and helpful, and I am pleased to say that our overseas visitors appreciated both the excellent meeting facilities and location, and the warm Aberdonian welcome – despite some chilly weather.”

The post Smartfish H2020 collaborations appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Shellfish Stock Assessment Modeller, closing date 10 March

Fri, 2020-02-14 14:00

Salary: £29759 – £34087
Location: Aberdeen
Hours: Around 37.00 per week
Closing Date: 10 March 2020 at midnight
Reference: IRC82515E

 

We are currently seeking applications for a Shellfish Stock Assessment Modeller within Marine Scotland based in Aberdeen. This is a 24 month fixed term and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The post of Shellfish Stock Assessment Modeller in the Stock Assessment and Modelling Group will play a key role in supporting the advice provided by Marine Scotland Science (MSS) to the Scottish Government. The post holder will be responsible for developing approaches (for data compilation and stock assessment) to be used in support of advice on sustainable shellfish fisheries management.

The Stock Assessment and Modelling Group is part of the wider Fisheries Assessment and Advice Programme within the Coastal and Offshore Fisheries Network of Marine Scotland Science, based at the Marine Laboratory, Aberdeen. This post will report to the Stock Assessment and Modelling Group leader.

 

Qualifications Required: 

For jobs in Band B & C you must hold a minimum of 3 Highers or equivalent.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

 

Essential Criteria:

1. Evidence of strong numeric ability with experience of applying mathematical models to environmental, biological or fishery systems.
2. Good computational skills with proven ability to programme in a high level language (such as R), particularly with respect to data manipulation and analysis.
3. Excellent communication skills with experience of preparing reports.
4. Strong planning and organisational skills, able to manage their own workload and prioritise effectively, dealing with competing demands.

 

Further Information:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants“. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Helen Dobby who can be reached at Helen.Dobby@gov.scot or 01312443001.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the recruitment team via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Shellfish Stock Assessment Modeller, closing date 10 March appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Senior Marine Ornithologist, closing date 10 March

Fri, 2020-02-14 10:00

Salary: £37418 – £45241
Location: Aberdeen/Edinburgh
Hours: Around 37.00 per week
Closing Date: 10 March 2020 at midnight
Reference: IRC81300E

We are currently seeking applications for a Senior Marine Ornithologist within Marine Scotland based in Aberdeen or Edinburgh. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The post-holder will work in the Renewable Energy Environmental Advice (REEA) group at Marine Scotland Science (MSS) to contribute to achieving Scottish Government goals for marine renewable energy and for protecting the marine environment.

The post provides specialist advice on marine birds to Marine Scotland Licensing Operations Team (MS-LOT) to support the assessment of environmental impacts of marine renewable and construction developments, and the provision of advice to Marine Scotland’s Policy and Planning Division (MPPD) in support of renewable energy policy, marine environment policy and on Marine Protected Areas (including Special Protection Areas). The advice provided is placed into the context of the interactions of marine bird populations and licenced marine activities, and the legislation and regulatory processes that are relevant to marine birds in Scotland.

The successful candidate will be expected to work independently, coordinate their work programme with the existing B3 Senior Ornithologist and other staff within REEA, and gain input from more senior staff where appropriate e.g. when critical issues have been identified and for QA.

To underpin the advice provided, they must ensure that they are familiar with the best available science through maintaining a working knowledge of best practice and detailed knowledge of marine bird ecology.

Qualifications Required:

Post-graduate degree in a relevant biology subject or equivalent experience such as successfully delivering similar duties to those required of the Senior Marine Ornithologist post holder, or relevant research on seabirds.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

Essential Criteria:

1. A good understanding of seabird biology and regulation, legislation and research relating to marine birds in Scottish and European waters. Including a good understanding of ornithology assessment tools used in environmental assessments for collision risk modelling, displacement assessment, and population viability analyses.
2. Demonstrable data analysis and statistical skills, using specialist statistical software, such as R or Matlab.
3. The ability to work independently with good organisational skills and the ability to prioritise workload.
4. Excellent written and oral communication skills, including the ability to explain scientific concepts to varied audiences, maintain good working relationships and proactively support colleagues.

Further Information:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants“. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Jared Wilson who can be reached on jared.wilson@gov.scot.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact HR Resourcing on 0131 244 8500 or via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Senior Marine Ornithologist, closing date 10 March appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Marine Mammal Biologist, closing date 5 March

Thu, 2020-02-13 09:00

Salary: £29759 – £34087
Location: Aberdeen
Hours: Around 37.00 per week
Closing Date: 5 March 2020 at midnight
Reference: IRC81419E

We are currently seeking applications for a Marine Mammal Biologist within the Directorate for Marine Scotland Science (MSS) based in Aberdeen. This is a 12 month fixed term and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The post-holder will work alongside the REEA staff at MSS to contribute to achieving Scottish Government goals for marine renewable energy and for protecting the marine environment. This will be achieved through contributing to the provision of advice to MS-LOT on interactions between marine mammals and the emerging marine renewable energy industries, and to MSPPD on marine mammal conservation issues. The post will also contribute to ongoing marine mammal research projects that involve the collection, processing and analyses of acoustic data. These activities will be placed into the context of the interactions of marine mammal populations and anthropogenic activities, and of the legislation that is relevant to marine mammals in Scotland.

To underpin advice, the post-holder will help to ensure that the best available science is incorporated into MSS activities and outputs. This will include the evaluation of the applicability of new methodologies relevant to marine mammals, and contributing to the commissioning and management of external research contracts.

The post-holder will need to be able to maintain and develop productive networks with relevant staff in external organisations, including SNH, JNCC, and academia. These networks will enable the post-holder to understand major developments in the scientific field, but there will also be a requirement to ensure that they continue to develop their skills and knowledge through understanding the relevant literature and continuous professional development. This will be a varied and interesting post in a highly applied scientific field, which will be suited to someone who enjoys a high level of autonomy and has the ability to successfully handle competing priorities.

 

Qualifications Required:

For jobs in Band B & C you must hold a minimum of 3 Highers or equivalent.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

 

Essential Criteria:

1. A good understanding of marine mammal biology.
2. Demonstrable data analysis and statistical skills, using specialist statistical software, such as R or Matlab.
3. The ability to work independently with good organisational skills and effectively manage projects.
4. Demonstrable experience of collecting, processing, analysing, and reporting on marine mammal passive acoustic or distribution, abundance of behavioural data.

 

Further Information:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification“. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Ross Culloch by email or at 0131 244 3749.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact Emma Crawford on 0131 244 5656 or via recruitment@gov.scot.

The post Vacancy: Marine Mammal Biologist, closing date 5 March appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Testing technology in the fishing sector

Wed, 2020-02-12 09:42

An international research project that is developing, testing and promoting new technology systems in the fishing sector is being trialled in Scottish waters by Marine Scotland scientists.

Now in its third year, the Smartfish H2020 project, which is funded through the EU’s Horizon 2020 fund and coordinated by the Norwegian research institute SINTEF Ocean, will be testing automated technologies that recognise, identify and counts fish in video footage from cameras on fishing boats.

Smartfish H2020 partners will discuss priorities for the third year of work, including how Marine Scotland plans on testing the technology in Scotland over the next two years, at a meeting in Aberdeen February 11 – 13.

Alongside this work to recognise, identify and count fish in video footage from cameras, Marine Scotland scientists have also been investigating the effects of light on the behaviour of different species of fish.

The Computer Vision System automatically identifying some whiting as they pass along a conveyor belt.

By steering them into different parts of the net, the fish may encounter other measures like ‘square mesh panels’ or sorting grids which can help smaller fish or less desirable species to escape.

Dr Coby Needle, Chief Fisheries Advisor for Scotland said:

“Over the last ten years Marine Scotland has been a leader in the field of using machine learning to recognise, identify and count fish in video footage from cameras.

“Using computers to automate the process in this way is a great step forward as it is quite a time consuming task for staff to go through and review videos manually.

“By using cameras we have to send fewer staff to sea on fishing vessels, which saves money and exposes them to less risk.”

Smartfish H2020

The post Testing technology in the fishing sector appeared first on Marine Scotland.

International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Tue, 2020-02-11 09:00

International Day of Women and Girls in Science is an opportunity for us to put the spotlight on some of the great work that’s going on in Marine Scotland Science.

This year’s big day also marks the first since we were awarded the Bronze Award by the Athena SWAN Charter as part of our work to tackle gender inequalities in science and engineering.

The Award recognises work undertaken to address gender equality in Higher Education and Research Institutes.

Dr Carey Fraser who leads on diversity and inclusion within Marine Scotland Science said:

“It is clear that more diverse teams perform better and produce better science. The science in Marine Scotland provides key evidence, information and functions for Scottish Government.

“There is an incredibly wide range of scientific work here that requires many STEM disciplines to sample, analyse and research our seas and rivers, and the habitats, animals and plants within them. We need a diverse range of skills and people to work on research vessel surveys, at rivers, and in our laboratories, to carry out the detailed biological, chemical, physical and mathematical analysis of samples and data that provides information of international significance with direct impact on marine management in Scotland and globally.”Berit Rabe_Scotia trip

Dr Berit Rabe is a physical oceanographer who has been working in Marine Scotland for around nine and a half years.

She works with oceanographic field data and hydrodynamic model outputs to understand the dynamics and circulations of sea lochs and the coastal regions around Scotland and to investigate sea lice dispersal.  She said:

“One of my proudest moments was becoming the designated female Scientist in Charge (SiC) for the December hydrographic research cruise to the northern North Sea and the Faroe-Shetland-Channel. This involves organising logistics before and after the cruise, ensuring we are achieving our scientific objectives, and leading the scientists at sea. I’ve enjoyed this role so much I’ve now been SiC taken on this role six times.

“It’s also been really incredible to be part of the team that achieved the Athena SWAN Bronze Award. Before the Athena SWAN Working Group was established there was no clear official route for staff to take on the role as SiC or gain experience to help them progress. Now I am helping to implement a process for training and progression that is assisting junior staff members, regardless of gender, to gain the experience they need to progress in their scientific discipline.”

Dr Faye Jackson has been working for Marine Scotland Science for nearly two years after being based at the Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory in Pitlochry during her PhD.

Her work is focused on understanding and predicting river temperature to identify where our famous salmon rivers are at risk due to climate change and developing tools and advice to support management decisions.  She said:

“Working at the Freshwater Fisheries Lab is a really interesting job, I’m constantly learning and looking for ways to take what can be a complicated story and distil it down to something that is accessible to people. It involves such a broad range of skills – analysing complicated data, making maps and making visual summaries which can then help river managers and others make decisions.  One of the benefits of being a scientist in the Scottish Government is getting to work on large scale projects that do have a genuine impact and have wider policy implications. With increases in river temperatures as a result of climate change, work which can underpin evidence-based management of the freshwater environment and protect iconic fish like salmon is even more crucial.”

More reading:

Dr Jessica Craig – Fisheries Population Modeller
Dr Berit Rabe – Physical Oceanographer
Pam Walsham -Senior Environmental Chemist 
Dr Faye Jackson – Salmon Assessment Modeller
Dr Rebecca Langton – Species Distribution Modeller

The post International Day of Women and Girls in Science appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Assessing Plankton in the UK

Mon, 2020-02-03 09:00

Two scientists from Marine Scotland Science (MSS), Dr Eileen Bresnan and Dr Margarita Machairopoulou, have been involved in the first ever assessment of the status of the plankton community in UK waters.

Led by the University of Plymouth, scientists from all around the UK joined together to share their datasets and knowledge to fill in some of the scientific gaps and understand change in pelagic habitats. The collective expertise of the group was critical in producing and interpreting the results.

Key to this assessment is the development of a new plankton lifeform indicator tool which enables assessment of pelagic habitat plankton diversity, regardless of sampling methods. There are thousands of phytoplankton and zooplankton species in UK waters – for this analysis they are collated into functional groups, called lifeforms, that perform similar functions in the ecosystem or have similar biochemical characteristics and lifecycles. Examples of lifeforms are: diatoms/dinoflagellates (silicate/flagellated microalgae) and holoplankton/meroplankton (animals that spend whole/part of their lifecycle in the water column).

This map shows the location of the different plankton monitoring programmes that were included in the assessment. Data from the MSS Scottish Coastal Observatory (SCObs) stations has made a key contribution to this study, particularly in the data poor areas on the west coast of Scotland. The SCObs monitoring sites at Stonehaven and Loch Ewe represent two of the three monitoring sites in the UK (L4 off Plymouth) where coastal zooplankton are monitored.

The main findings from the ICEGRAPH Project include:
  1. That the plankton community in UK waters has exhibited profound changes in distribution and abundance. For example, meroplankton (plankton who spend only part of their life cycle in the water column e.g. the larvae of star fish, sea urchins) are showing an increasing trend in abundance in both coastal and offshore areas around the UK. While diatoms (a type of microscopic algae) are increasing only in the northern North Sea (including areas around Orkney and Shetland), as well as the south east of England. However, some life forms e.g. dinoflagellates (another type of microscopic algae) show different trends between coastal (increasing) and offshore (decreasing) areas.
  2. These changes in the plankton community can impact energy flow in the marine food web to higher trophic levels (e.g. shifts in the balance between the abundances of small and large copepods (small crustaceans) can potentially alter the quality of food available to fish). The impacts of these changes on commercial fish stocks require investigation.
  3. Some of these changes have been linked to sea surface temperature (SST), which has warmed around the UK. SST has been used as a proxy for climate change as other physical/biological factors such as water column stability/ prey availability which can influence plankton abundances are also influenced by warming temperatures.

 

Further Information:
  •  The ICEGRAPH Project is funded by the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) and the Marine Management Organisation (MMO).
  • Plankton are organisms that live and drift in the water column. Phytoplankton are microscopic single celled algae. They occupy the base of the marine food web using the energy from sunlight to produce carbohydrates and releasing oxygen via the process called photosynthesis. Phytoplankton are ecologically important. They are a major food source for zooplankton, act as a carbon sink by taking up CO2 dissolved in the water and producing 50% of the earth’s oxygen. Zooplankton are animals with sizes that range from microscopic (e.g. star fish larvae) to visible with the naked eye (e.g. jellyfish). They feed on phytoplankton and some on other zooplankton. Zooplankton, in turn, are preyed on by fish larvae some of which have a high commercial importance such as cod and herring. Thus energy from phytoplankton is passed up the food web.
  • The water above the seabed is called the pelagic habitat. It is really important to be able to assess the status of the plankton in the pelagic habitat as it allows the detection of change that could potentially impact higher trophic levels and negatively impact the marine ecosystem.
  • Scottish Coastal Observatory (SCObs) topic sheet
  • SCObs report
  • North Atlantic Fisheries College
  • Orkney Harbour Authority
  • Improving Confidence Evaluating GES for Regional Assessments of Pelagic Habitats (ICEGRAPH)

The post Assessing Plankton in the UK appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Recent Decrease in Ocean Salinity in the North Atlantic Waters off Scotland

Fri, 2020-01-31 11:52

Research published in Nature Communications this week has investigated the recent, large reduction in salinity measurements in the North Atlantic Ocean. Evidence of this surface salinity change includes the time series collected by Marine Scotland Science in the Faroe-Shetland Channel.

Scientists observed the freshening event over a large region of the North Atlantic, extending from waters to the west of the UK to Iceland in 2016. For some of the observational time series, the measured salinities were the lowest since records began in the late 19th century. In the Faroe-Shetland Channel, lower salinities were observed during the Great Salinity Anomaly in the 1970s, which was caused by increased freshwater transport through Fram Strait (the passage between Greenland and Svalbard) and winds driving increased freshwater transport from the Greenland shelves.

Observed salinities in the North Atlantic Water in the Faroe-Shetland Channel, collected by Marine Scotland Science. The colour of the bars corresponds to the standardised anomaly relative to the 1981-2010 average (as mean) and standard deviation. The observed salinity is plotted as a bar from the 1981-2010 average salinity (35.387).

The recent salinity change has a different mechanism and was caused by abnormal wind patterns driving Arctic freshwater from the Labrador Current (close to the Canadian continental shelf) into the North Atlantic Current. This current transports waters from the North American region of the Atlantic Ocean towards the UK coast. It is an important influence on environmental conditions in the waters off the Scottish West Coast. This work shows that understanding changes in the circulation further westward in the subpolar North Atlantic provide important context for conditions in our region.

The Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s impacted the ecosystem productivity in our region. Some of the authors of this study are currently considering the impact of this recent freshening event on the biological productivity.

Caption for Main Feature Image: Map showing the average surface circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean, arrows show surface current vectors (coloured by strength). The schematic representation of the major currents is overlain in red (in deep water) and yellow (continental shelf). North Atlantic Current (NAC), East Reykjanes Ridge Current (ERRC) East Greenland Current (EGC), West Greenland Current (WGC), Labrador Current (LC) and Mann Eddy (ME). From Holliday et al., 2020.

Further Information

The post Recent Decrease in Ocean Salinity in the North Atlantic Waters off Scotland appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Survey of Scallop Stocks around Shetland Islands

Mon, 2020-01-27 14:30

MRV Alba na Mara Programme
Survey: 0220A
Duration: 25 January – 9 February 2020
Fishing Gear: Scallop dredges

Objectives:

1. To carry out a survey of scallop stocks around the Shetland Islands.

2. To age, measure and assess shell damage on all scallops caught.

3. To collect information on by-catch of other commercial fish and shellfish species.

4. To identify, quantify numbers, and damage assess of starfish species in all dredge tows.

5. To collect whole scallops for heavy metal testing as part of the OSPAR assessment of hazardous substances in the marine environment.

 

Procedure:

Figure 1

The survey will depart Fraserburgh on 25 January and, after vessel drills, make passage for Shetland.

Scallop dredge hauls will be made at sites used on previous surveys as shown Figure 1. Hauls will be of 30 minutes duration. From each haul, all of the scallops will be measured to the half centimeter below and aged. Numbers and size distribution of commercial fish and shellfish species will be recorded along with scallop shell damage and starfish numbers and species.

The survey will end in Fraserburgh on 9 February when staff and gear will stay on board to carry out survey 0320A.

 

Further Information:

The post Survey of Scallop Stocks around Shetland Islands appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Demersal Trawling Survey in North Sea

Mon, 2020-01-27 11:00

MRV Scotia Programme
Survey
: 0220S
Duration: 24 January – 13 February 2020
Fishing Gear: GOV Trawl (BT 137) with ground gear A & B; MIK Net (Round Frame with IK depressor); MIKeyM net (attached onto the MIK net on selected stations)

 

Objective:

1. To complete an internationally coordinated demersal trawling survey in the North Sea in ICES area IV.
2. To undertake MIK sampling for pre-metamorphosed herring and sprat larvae during the hours of darkness within the trawl survey area. MIKeyM samples will also be collected from the MIK deployments.
3. To obtain temperature and salinity data from the surface and seabed at each trawling station using a SEABIRD 19+ CTD.
4. To collect samples of surface and near seabed water for nutrient analysis (nitrates, silicates and phosphates).
5. To collect additional biological data in connection with the EU Data Collection Framework (DCF).
6. To collect electronic monitoring footage of selected species of known length on the conveyor belt.

 

Trawling:

Hauls of 30 minutes duration will be made using the GOV trawl. Wherever possible, fishing will be carried out during daylight hours as defined below:

 

Daylight period – GMT South of 57 30’N North of 57 30’N 24-31 January 0747 – 1635 0815 – 1545 1-10 February 0729 – 1658 0749 – 1636 11-13 February 0708 – 1720 0723 -1705

 

For each degree of longitude west, four minutes will be added to the time; for each degree of longitude east, four minutes will be subtracted.

 

The survey area is outlined in the attached chart (see Figure 1) but the exact fishing position will be decided in collaboration with the fishing master. The Scanmar system will be used throughout the survey to monitor headline height, wing spread, door spread and distance covered during each haul. A bottom contact sensor (BCS) will be attached to the ground-gear and the data collected will be downloaded after each haul.

 

Catches will be processed as per the most recent version of the IBTS sampling manual (ICES SISP 10 –IBTS IX) with additional biological data collected for species as determined.

 

MIK Sampling

Pre-metamorphosed herring larvae will be sampled during the hours of darkness with the MIK mid-water trawl (Round frame). A minimum of two double oblique tows is planned for every square within the assigned survey area. The vertical profile of the tow will be monitored using the Scanmar system. During this survey the small 20 mm round frame net (MIKeyM net) will also be deployed on all MIK stations for the purpose of collecting pelagic fish eggs from the survey area.

 

Hydrography

Surface and bottom temperatures and salinities will be taken at all trawl stations.

Figure 1: Scottish survey area for 0220S. Dashed line at 57.5 degrees north indicates dividing line between groundgear types (A south of line, B north of line).

 

Additional Information:

The post Demersal Trawling Survey in North Sea appeared first on Marine Scotland.

MRV Alba na Mara 0120A – latest news

Tue, 2020-01-21 08:00

The annual underwater television Nephrops research survey neither started on the 6th January 2020 nor worked on the west coast, despite the survey plan. The vessel was initially storm bound in Fraserburgh for three days and once out of the harbour the 5m+ swell along the north coast meant the vessel couldn’t reach the west coast.

 

However in sheltered waters off Nairn, work was possible and prior to the half landing in Inverness, a time lapse camera had been deployed; four sites had been surveyed using both the TV sledge and drop frame (to compare the observed difference in burrow abundance between the two systems); a trawled site had been surveyed with the sledge 15 times (to observe the rate in which burrows are re-established following trawling); new data logging software had been trialled and updated; an innovative high definition camera (which uses the existing copper cable to transmit live footage rather than fibre-optic cable, which is not available on MSS vessels) had been piloted; two sessions using an ROV had taken place; in addition to a significant amount of on board training , as the survey had two new members of MSS staff on board.

 

One diversion was when the vessel had some visitors in the form of the SAR team, which used Alba for practice to lower a crew member from a helicopter. So whilst storms were being experienced around the coast, the work continued in the western Moray Firth unhindered, with a back drop of memorable sunrises/sunsets and the occasional accompany seal … but no dolphins yet!

 

 

Further Information:

The post MRV Alba na Mara 0120A – latest news appeared first on Marine Scotland.

MRV Scotia 0120S – latest news

Mon, 2020-01-20 12:30

Here we go again! Like every January for the past 20+ years, our group set off on the Scotia from Leith to collect flat fish, mud, and more recently microplastics. This year, we will remain along the coast whilst having a fair distance to travel (see map below).

Map 1. Sediment sites location

Alongside the usual sampling sites we also want to explore new locations to improve the coverage of certain area. Therefore we will attempt to fish in 3 new sites (Central Minch, North of Coll and West Orkney), weather permitting!

So far, we managed to travel all the way to the Solway Firth to collect samples … witnessing some beautiful sceneries on the way, such as Aisla Craig south of Arran. We also managed to deploy the catamaran to collect surface microplastics despite difficult wind conditions.

We are now travelling back north towards the Minch, hoping that Storm Brendan will allow us to keep sampling. The sea has been fairly rough today (Tuesday 14th January) and unfortunately the wind and swell will only start to settle later on in the week.

The team has been working really well despite the conditions and everyone seems pretty happy.

Additional Information:

MRV Scotia 0120 Blog Post
Marine Scotland Website
MRV Scotia Topic Sheet

The post MRV Scotia 0120S – latest news appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Fishery Assistant, closing date 11 February

Tue, 2020-01-14 17:30

Salary: £19314 – £21482
Location: Fraserburgh
Hours: Around 37.00 per week
Closing Date: 11 February 2020 at midnight
Reference: IRC80014E
Employment Type: Permanent Employee

We are currently seeking applications for a Fishery Assistant within the Marine Scotland based in Fraserburgh. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

This vacancy offers an exciting opportunity to join a small team and provide admin support to the fishery officers.The Fishery Assistant is the first point of contact for the public and other government departments, stakeholders. As such, they must have knowledge of Marine Scotland’s Aims and Objectives and have the knowledge and ability to be able to put the caller in touch with the correct person.

Qualifications Required:
For jobs in Band A, you must hold a minimum of 5 Standard Grades (grades 1 – 3) or Ordinary Grades (A-C) including English and a numerical subject.Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

Essential Criteria:
1. Excellent communication skills and confidence in dealing with a wide range of internal and external stakeholders.
2. The ability to handle and analyse information to assist decision-making of senior officers.
3. Be able to work as part of a small team and also have the ability to work on own initiative, seeking support and guidance from line management as required.

Further Information:
For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Stuart McCubbin who can be reached at stuart.mccubbin@scotland.gsi.gov.uk or 0300 244 9187.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the Resourcing Team via recruitment@gov.scot.

Further information for this job:

The post Vacancy: Fishery Assistant, closing date 11 February appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Marine Planning Policy Officer, closing date 11 February

Mon, 2020-01-13 14:30
Salary: B2 – £29,759 – £34,087 Location: Glasgow Hours: Around 37.00 per week Closing Date: 11 February 2020 at midnight Reference: IRC74997E Employment Type: Permanent Employee

We are currently seeking applications for a Marine Planning Policy Officer  within the Marine Scotland  based in Glasgow or Edinburgh.  This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

Marine Scotland is the lead marine management organisation in Scotland. It sits within DG Economy and is a part of the core Scottish Government. Its purpose is to manage Scotland’s seas for prosperity and environmental sustainability, working closely with a range of delivery partners to do so. With 61% of the UK sea area, a fishing and aquaculture industry worth over £1 billion and 50,000 jobs in the marine economy and at least 6,500 species of marine plants and animals this is a high profile and fast paced policy area.

The Marine Planning and Policy Division is responsible for ensuring the sustainable development of Scotland’s marine area. This post sits within the Marine Planning & Strategy Team.

Effective marine planning is key to achieving Marine Scotland’s vision, ensuring that the marine and coastal environment is managed in an integrated and holistic way. In 2015 Scotland published its first National Marine Plan – a single framework for managing our seas. The next step, following the National Marine Plan is to translate this into regional marine plans ensuring that marine planning can be implemented effectively at the local level, allowing local and regional communities and sectoral stakeholders to address local issues and inform decision making.

The primary focus of this role will be to facilitate and manage the implementation and operational management of the Regional Marine Planning and Local Coastal Partnerships and ultimately assist these organisations in delivering marine planning initiatives at a regional level. To date, Clyde and Shetland RMPPs have been established and are in the early stages of developing their Regional Plans. Orkney has been identified as the next region to establish an MPP. It is the intention that Regional Marine Planning Partnerships and Plans will eventually be in place for 11 marine regions around Scotland. This post will play a pivotal role in making this happen.

Qualifications Required:

For jobs in Band B & C you must hold a minimum of 3 Highers or equivalent.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.

Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be automatically sifted out.

Essential Criteria:

1. Excellent project management skills with a track record of delivering projects on time and on budget.
2. Ability to analyse complex information to inform policy or decision making.
3. Ability to communicate complex information clearly and concisely with a broad range of interested parties.
4. Experience of collaborating with delivery partners to achieve successful outcomes.

Further Information:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Ian Black  who can be reached at ian.black@gov.scot or on 0131 244 5900.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact Resourcing Team  on 0131 244 8217 or via recruitment@gov.scot 

Further information for this job:

The post Vacancy: Marine Planning Policy Officer, closing date 11 February appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Nephrops Activity on the West Coast

Thu, 2020-01-09 10:00

MRV Alba na Mara Programme

Survey: 0120A

Duration: 6-22 January 2020

Gear: 

Large TV drop frame
TV sledge
Static time lapse camera frame
1 x 600m umbilical towing cable
1 x armoured cable
Video cameras and associated equipment (plus backup)
Stand-alone time lapse stills camera, recorder and power supply (for static camera frame)
Four lasers and 60cm bracket for the drop frame
Adjustable laser bracket
1 x BT201 prawn trawl (plus minimal spares)
Day grab, sieves and table
ROV Video Ray model 3
Prawn sorting table
Go Pro deep water housing

 

Objectives:
  • To obtain video footage from Nephrops grounds using adjustable lasers mounted on the TV sledge in able to estimate Nephrops burrow entrance size.
  • To compare two different methodologies to establish Nephrops burrow abundance (using the sledge and drop frame UWTV systems).
  • To monitor burrow reconstruction following trawl activity.
  • To trial the OTAQ high definition camera.
  • To observe burrowing fauna on Nephrops grounds using the static, time lapse camera.
  • To use the video footage to record occurrence of other benthic fauna and evidence of commercial trawling activity.
  • To stream the trawl to adjust warp spooling.
  • To collect trawl caught samples of Nephrops for comparison of reproductive condition and morphometrics.
  • To record and collect any trawl caught marine litter.

 

Procedure:

Survey activity will be very dependent on the weather, and it may be required to alter the work plans during the survey.

 

On leaving port, the vessel will head to the Southern trench and shoot the trawl, paying out as much warp as possible. The trawl will then be recovered immediately allowing for adjustments to be made to the spooling process as required by the vessel.

 

The vessel will then head west to Loch Torridon, where potential sites for deploying the static camera frame will be surveyed using the ROV. Once a suitable site is selected the frame, equipped with a time lapse camera, flash and power supply, will be lowered onto the seabed on Nephrops grounds. Depending on the weather and progress with the work schedule, this frame will remain in place until the day before the half landing, when the frame and camera will be recovered, the data downloaded and then returned to the seabed until the work on the west coast has been completed near the end of the survey.

 

Following the deployment of the time lapse camera, the next task during the first half of the survey will be to carry out burrow recovery trials at two sites. Ideally this work will be carried out in the southern end of the Inner Sound; however, this will depend on the availability of a sufficiently large enough area, free from creels and other potentially high risk objects – a visual inspection of the area will be required before any work is undertaken. Initially the operation will involve carrying out five standard sledge tows on known Nephrops grounds, 500 m apart in a linear path at both of the trawl sites. Following the sledge work the trawl will deployed over the areas previously surveyed by the sledge. Each of the sites where the sledge was deployed will be revisited on a regular basis (where practicably possible) over the remaining days before the half landing and the sledge redeployed on the original positions. The cod end will remain open during the trawls in an effort to return as many live animals (i.e. Nephrops and other species) to the grounds as possible to maximize the potential for burrows to be re-excavated. This work is an extension to similar trials carried out on 0119A.

 

During the burrow recovery trials, a high definition camera will be attached to the TV sledge to record footage in parallel to the standard analogue Konesberg camera used in UWTV surveys. A comparison of the two formats will be undertaken and examined for quality control purposes.

Following the recovery and redeployment of the static camera frame the vessel will then head to port for the half landing where a change of scientific and engineering staff will take place.

 

Comparative trials between the drop frame and sledge UWTV system will be carried out during the second half of the trip. This work will be undertaken at several sites in the Sound of Raasay and the Inner Sound (as time and weather permits) by deploying the sledge five times on known Nephrops grounds, in parallel tracks 200 m long and approximately 50 m apart. The drop frame will then be deployed over the same ground a further three times and at 900 to the direction that the sledge travelled, with video of the sea bed being recorded at all times with both methods. This work will be a continuation of work completed on previous surveys. Precise details of the locations where the trials are to be carried out will be discussed nearer the time with the ship’s officers and be dependent on weather, commercial activity and habitat suitability.

 

Throughout the survey, two lasers on an adjustable bracket will be attached to the sledge. The distance between the lasers will be adjusted between deployments and provide a comparative scale to estimate burrow size.

 

Time and weather permitting, trawling may take place and all Nephrops caught during the trawls will be assessed for morphometric, weight, maturity and sex data. All landed litter will be recorded and returned to port.

 

All sediment samples obtained during the survey will be frozen.

 

Further Information:

The post Nephrops Activity on the West Coast appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Marine Scotland Science Discover New Coral Species on Rockall

Thu, 2020-01-09 09:00

 

A view of each side of the same specimen of Ptilella greyi.

Scientists from Marine Scotland Science (MSS) have discovered a new species of coral on Rockall Bank in the North East Atlantic. The discovery is of an animal known as a sea pen, which as it lacks a hard outer skeleton is often described as a soft coral. The species is described fully in a scientific paper titled “Resurrection of the sea pen genus Ptilella” which was published in journal Scientia Marina in the later end of 2019.

Ptilella greyi is a large (up to 60 cm tall) ‘meaty’ sea pen that is widely distributed over central Rockall Bank within the 145-390 m depth range. One of the larger invertebrates now known to be present on Rockall Bank, the species was first found in 2007 by MSS scientists undertaking a routine survey with their research vessel MRV Scotia. Following the initial find, MSS scientist Jim Drewery undertook a full trawl inspection subsequent to every deployment within the area, sifting through around 1500 trawls over the next decade, looking for this new species. This allowed for the species distribution to be mapped coherently and for a picture to start building up; showing where the species was present and, also importantly, where it was not.

Marine survey expert Jim Drewery collaborated with sea pen experts Dr Pablo López-González and Francisco J. García-Cárdena from the University of Seville over this period, as new data and further specimens were found. The paper describes the taxonomic features of the species and, backed up by molecular data and literature searches going back to the late 19th century, indicated that the classification required the resurrection of the ‘extinct’ genus Ptilella, first proposed in 1870 by Dr John Edward Gray but discarded by taxonomists in later years.

Head of Marine Scotland Science, Tim McDonnell OBE commented: “This is another fantastic find that further highlights our expertise in marine science. Thanks to our long-term monitoring work that is facilitated through vessels like MRV Scotia, this sea pen has been correctly identified as a completely new species, for which the resurrection of the Ptilella genus was necessary.”

Named because of their close resemblance to quill-pens, sea pens are colonial animals that are found in the softer sediments of the seabed. Sea pens use specialised polyps (hollow stalks with a mouth and tentacles) to filter-feed, and are found in all oceans from intertidal areas to those more than 6000 m in depth. The image above shows a view of each side of the same specimen of Ptilella greyi.

The surveys that facilitated this research were part of a long-term monitoring programme by MSS that collects data on fish stocks in the deep sea. Surveys contributing data to this research included the annual Rockall Haddock Surveys, the annual Rockall Anglerfish Surveys and the ecologically themed (OFFshore Fisheries and CONservation (OFFCON) surveys of 2011 and 2012.

The original specimens of Ptilella greyi examined in this research will be displayed at the National Museum Scotland, the Natural History Museum, London, the Museu de Zoologia de Barcelona and at the University of Seville.

(Featured image above: Observed distribution of Ptilella greyi.)

Further Information:

The post Marine Scotland Science Discover New Coral Species on Rockall appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Clean Seas Environmental Monitoring Programme

Wed, 2020-01-08 10:00

MRV Scotia Programme

Survey: 0120S

Duration: 6-21 January 2020

Fishing gear: BT 137 with Ground gear E;

Sediment Sampling: Day grab

Litter sampling: Catamaran and neuston trawl

Water sampling: Aquatracka fluorometer, Seabird 25 and modified acoustic sledge

 

Objectives:
  1. To undertake water, sediment and biological sampling for the Clean Seas Environmental Monitoring Programme (CSEMP).
  2. Monitor and record all litter brought aboard in all trawls. Sample water column and sediment for micro-plastic litter. Collect fish guts and any other biota of interest for microplastic research.
  3. If possible, deploy Aquatracka and Seabird 25 to collect fluorescence data.

 

Procedure:

Scientific staff will join the vessel on 05 January 2020 to conduct final set-up of scientific equipment. After required drills, the vessel will depart Leith (am) on 06 January and head for the nearest sampling station as agreed with the master and fishing master. The order in which sampling stations will be undertaken will be agreed on a daily basis and in line with current weather conditions.

Fish sampling for biological effect assessment will be carried out at multiple locations detailed in Table 1.

Due to a lack of sites in certain sampling regions, new sites (in red in Table 1) will be tested and assessed for the collection of dab (in Central Minch, North of Coll and West of Orkney). If successful, the target species will be sampled for biological effect assessment and chemistry analysis.

Fish will be sampled for chemical analyses, biological effects and fish diseases (Table 2). Some biological effects measurements will be carried out during the survey.

Sediment sampling will be carried out at the Montrose bank, East coast, Inner and Outer Moray Firth, Minch North, Minch South, Colonsay, Outer Hebrides, Sea of Hebrides and Solway sites. Sediment sampling will also be carried out at the four CSEMP fixed sites (NMMP85 – North Minch, NMMP95 – Inner Moray Firth, NMMP105 – Outer Moray Firth, NMMP165 – Montrose Bank) (see Map 1). Sediments will be sampled for chemical analyses at all locations. The coordinates of all sediments site is shown in Table 3 (Primary sites) and Table 4 (Secondary sites – used if Sampling a Primary site failed).

 

Sediment sampling will also be attempted in the West of Orkney (exact location to be confirmed – see green circle on (Map 1) to add another sampling site on the CSEMP programme.

 

Monitoring of all litter brought on board during trawling operations will continue throughout the survey. The catamaran will be deployed to sample for micro-plastics whenever possible (exact high priority locations to be confirmed) and samples processed onboard as far as possible. Additional sediment samples will also be taken for micro-plastics where possible. Fish guts and any other biota of interest might also be preserved and returned to the lab for analysis (exact sampling requirements to be confirmed)

 

The Aquatracka will be deployed in the Forth and in at least one other area to obtain reference measurements. Vertical profiling will be performed and tows using the modified acoustic sledge will also be tested.

 

Table 3: Sediment grabs locations – PRIMARY SITES.

REGION Field ID decLat decLong Latitude Longitude Outer Forth E of Isle of May 56.1994 -2.4096 56 11.96N 002 24.57W N of Wheat Stack 55.9998 -2.2497 55 59.99N 002 14.98W NE Torness 56.1001 -2.3404 56 6.00N 002 20.42W Rath Grounds 56.1593 -2.6593 56 9.56N 002 39.56W S of Isle of May 56.1335 -2.5351 56 8.01N 002 32.11W The Minch North UM1.1 58.0350 -6.2100 58 2.10N 006 12.60W UM1.2 58.1060 -5.6950 58 6.36N 005 41.70W UM1.3 57.9870 -5.7430 57 59.22N 005 44.58W UM1.4 58.2000 -5.8800 58 12.00N 005 52.80W UM1.5 57.9910 -5.5810 57 59.46N 005 34.86W 85se 58.0000 -5.6667 58 0.00N 005 40.00W The Minch South UM2.1 58.1120 -5.9310 58 6.72N 005 55.86W UM2.2 58.1320 -5.8980 58 7.92N 005 53.88W UM2.3 57.8590 -6.0280 57 51.54N 006 1.68W UM2.4 57.7540 -6.0200 57 45.24N 006 1.20W UM2.5 57.7580 -5.9130 57 45.48N 005 54.78W Sea of Hebrides SOH1.1 56.7640 -7.4390 56 45.84N 007 26.34W SOH1.2 56.6000 -7.4990 56 36.00N 007 29.94W SOH1.3 56.8310 -6.8440 56 49.86N 006 50.64W SOH1.4 56.4460 -6.7310 56 26.76N 006 43.86W SOH1.5 56.6270 -7.5260 56 37.62N 007 31.56W SOH1.6 56.6850 -6.8890 56 41.10N 006 53.34W SOH1.7 57.1010 -7.1720 57 6.06N 007 10.32W SOH1.8 56.8930 -6.5550 56 53.58N 006 33.30W SOH1.9 56.3870 -6.4770 56 23.22N 006 28.62W SOH1.10 56.8100 -6.6940 56 48.60N 006 41.64W Hebrides HEB1 1 57.5560 -8.6250 57 33.36N 008 37.50W HEB1 2 57.6370 -8.6370 57 38.22N 008 38.22W HEB1 3 57.5770 -8.6640 57 34.62N 008 39.84W HEB1 4 57.3750 -8.4330 57 22.50N 008 25.98W HEB1 5 57.6000 -8.5810 57 36.00N 008 34.86W Colonsay COL1 56.1100 -6.0800 56 6.60N 006 4.80W COL2 56.0890 -6.1420 56 5.34N 006 8.52W COL3 56.1180 -6.0510 56 7.08N 006 3.06W COL4 56.1520 -6.0720 56 9.12N 006 4.32W COL5 56.1680 -6.1160 56 10.08N 006 6.96W Solway SOL1 54.7500 -4.0000 54 45.00N 003 60.00W SOL2 54.7665 -3.8345 54 45.99N 003 50.07W SOL3 54.7565 -3.8630 54 45.39N 003 51.78W SOL4 54.7500 -3.9157 54 45.00N 003 54.94W SOL5 54.7272 -3.9600 54 43.63N 003 57.60W East Coast  EC1.1 56.5570 -2.5100 56 33.42N 002 30.60W EC1.2 56.6690 -2.1630 56 40.14N 002 9.78W EC1.3 56.6270 -2.3810 56 37.62N 002 22.86W EC1.4 56.5180 -2.5460 56 31.08N 002 32.76W EC1.5 56.6780 -2.1690 56 40.68N 002 10.14W 165se 56.5000 -1.5000 56 30.00N 001 30.00W Moray Firth MF1.1 57.7320 -3.8110 57 43.92N 003 48.66W MF1.2 57.9040 -3.6480 57 54.24N 003 38.88W MF1.3 57.7990 -3.3580 57 47.94N 003 21.48W MF1.4 57.9440 -3.5460 57 56.64N 003 32.76W MF1.5 57.9120 -3.5300 57 54.72N 003 31.80W MF2.1 57.9600 -2.8450 57 57.60N 002 50.70W MF2.2 57.9150 -2.7380 57 54.90N 002 44.28W MF2.3 57.8670 -1.9490 57 52.02N 001 56.94W MF2.4 57.8690 -2.8690 57 52.14N 002 52.14W MF2.5 57.8040 -2.1900 57 48.24N 002 11.40W MF2.6 57.7990 -2.6530 57 47.94N 002 39.18W MF2.7 57.8610 -3.1720 57 51.66N 003 10.32W MF2.8 57.8440 -2.9130 57 50.64N 002 54.78W MF2.9 57.9050 -3.0410 57 54.30N 003 2.46W MF2.10 57.9050 -3.0410 57 54.30N 003 2.46W 105se 58.0500 -3.0000 58 3.00N 002 60.00W 95se 57.6667 -3.8167 57 40.00N 003 49.00W

 

Table 4: Sediment grabs locations – SECONDARY SITES

REGION Field ID decLat decLong Latitude Longitude The Minch North UM1.6 58.1330 -5.6540 58 7.98N 005 39.24W UM1.7 58.3080 -6.0300 58 18.48N 006 1.80W UM1.8 58.1130 -6.1690 58 6.78N 006 10.14W UM1.9 58.2560 -5.5300 58 15.36N 005 31.80W UM1.10 58.2060 -5.4990 58 12.36N 005 29.94W The Minch South UM2.6 57.8770 -6.1830 57 52.62N 006 10.98W UM2.7 57.8420 -6.1730 57 50.52N 006 10.38W UM2.8 57.9390 -6.0410 57 56.34N 006 2.46W UM2.9 57.7180 -6.1330 57 43.08N 006 7.98W UM2.10 57.8310 -5.9900 57 49.86N 005 59.40W Sea of Hebrides SOH1.11 56.8430 -6.6550 56 50.58N 006 39.30W SOH1.12 56.7570 -7.1110 56 45.42N 007 6.66W SOH1.13 56.9120 -7.2950 56 54.72N 007 17.70W SOH1.14 56.7490 -6.9390 56 44.94N 006 56.34W SOH1.15 56.4480 -7.1510 56 26.88N 007 9.06W Hebrides HEB1 6 57.6050 -8.7390 57 36.30N 008 44.34W HEB1 7 57.6050 -8.6920 57 36.30N 008 41.52W HEB1 8 57.5150 -8.6540 57 30.90N 008 39.24W HEB1 9 57.4880 -8.6440 57 29.28N 008 38.64W HEB1 10 57.5790 -8.7550 57 34.74N 008 45.30W East Coast EC1 6 56.7190 -2.2080 56 43.14N 002 12.48W EC1 7 56.6350 -2.3540 56 38.10N 002 21.24W EC1 8 56.5450 -2.4050 56 32.70N 002 24.30W EC1 9 56.5540 -2.4220 56 33.24N 002 25.32W EC1 10 56.6490 -2.2520 56 38.94N 002 15.12W Moray Firth MF1 6 57.9010 -3.4510 57 54.06N 003 27.06W MF1 7 57.8740 -3.6280 57 52.44N 003 37.68W MF1 8 57.6440 -3.6640 57 38.64N 003 39.84W MF1 9 57.7200 -3.6250 57 43.20N 003 37.50W MF1 10 57.9200 -3.6600 57 55.20N 003 39.60W MF2 11 57.7750 -2.3650 57 46.50N 002 21.90W MF2 12 57.8420 -2.1150 57 50.52N 002 6.90W MF2 13 57.7980 -2.3940 57 47.88N 002 23.64W MF2 14 57.8280 -1.9120 57 49.68N 001 54.72W MF2 15 57.7940 -2.3640 57 47.64N 002 21.84W

 

Map 1. Sediment sites location

Additional Information:

The post Clean Seas Environmental Monitoring Programme appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Aquarium Technician, closing date 22 January 2020

Mon, 2020-01-06 15:00

Salary: £22557 – £24159
Location: Aberdeen
Hours: Around 37.00 per week
Closing Date: 22 January 2020 at midnight
Reference: IRC79719E
Employment Type: Permanent Employee

We are currently seeking applications for an Aquarium Technician within the Marine Scotland based in Aberdeen. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The successful candidate will participate in a variety of research projects carried out in the Aquarium Services Group and will also support projects in other programmes and research themes within Marine Scotland Science. Involvement will vary from routine welfare checks and assisting scientists and the daily running of the aquarium facility. Operation and Maintenance of the aquarium facilities at the Marine Laboratory, this includes the identification, repair, resolution of faults within Aquarium facilities and consultation with on-site contractors.

Qualifications Required:

For jobs in Bands A, you must hold a minimum of 5 Standard Grades (grades 1-3) or Ordinary Grades (grades A-C) including English and a numerical subject.

Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.
• Experience of fish husbandry and/or working with live fish.
• Experience of working with plant, machinery and control/monitoring systems associated with, or of a type used in, aquarium systems.
• Knowledge of Plumbing, pumps, and filtration systems associated with aquarium systems.
• Competent and confident in the use of IT Packages including Microsoft Word, Excel and Outlook.

Essential Criteria:

1. Experience of fish husbandry and/or working with live fish.
2. Experience of working with plant, machinery and control/monitoring systems associated with, or of a type used in, aquarium systems.
3. Knowledge of Plumbing, pumps, and filtration systems associated with aquarium systems.
4. Competent and confident in the use of IT Packages including Microsoft Word, Excel and Outlook.

 

Further Information:

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact Ben Williamson who can be reached at ben.williamson@gov.scot or 0131 244 3717.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the Resourcing Team on 0131 244 5656 or via recruitment@gov.scot.

Further information for this job:

The post Vacancy: Aquarium Technician, closing date 22 January 2020 appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Vacancy: Fishery Assistant, Edinburgh – closing date: 14 January 2020

Fri, 2019-12-20 09:00

We are currently seeking applications for a Fishery Assistant within Marine Scotland based in Edinburgh. This is a permanent and pensionable appointment and new entrants will normally start on the minimum of the pay range. Candidates with a disability who meet the essential criteria below will be invited to the assessments.

The successful candidate will join the Marine Scotland Compliance division. Marine Scotland is responsible for the integrated management of Scotland’s seas. Marine Scotland Compliance, a division of Marine Scotland, is entrusted with the effective monitoring and enforcement of marine and fishing laws.

Qualifications Required
  • You must hold a minimum of 5 Standard Grades (grades 1-3) or Ordinary Grades (A-C) including English and a numerical subject.
  • Other qualifications equivalent to these may also be acceptable, if you are in any doubt please contact to discuss.
  • Please note: If you fail to demonstrate how you meet the minimum qualifications as stated above, your application will be sifted out.
Essential Criteria
  1.  Good IT and analytical skills, with experience of using Microsoft Office packages, i.e. Access, Excel, Word. Knowledge of government systems (including fishery related databases and in house software packages) would also be beneficial.
  2. Excellent administration and organisational skills. The successful candidate should be proactive, with the ability to prioritise and plan workloads, working to tight deadlines.
  3. Ability to work as part of a team, sharing information and ideas and when necessary, to work autonomously to take forward specific tasks.
  4. Good written and verbal communication skills and confidence in dealing with a wide range of people at all levels including internal and external stakeholders.
Further Information

For further information on this vacancy please download and review the “Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants” which you will find below. To apply, you must fully complete and submit an online application via this website before the closing date. To learn more about this opportunity, please contact John Mills who can be reached at john.mills@gov.scot or 0131 244 4654.

If you experience any difficulties accessing our website or completing the online application form, please contact the Resourcing Team on 0131 244 8500 or via recruitment@gov.scot

Further information for this job

Person Specification and Further Information for Job Applicants

Apply for this job

You should read each of the Essential Criteria and think about a time or an example that can help demonstrate your knowledge/skills. Remember, this must be evidence based and your answers should be clear, concise and reflect what actions you undertook. You may want to use the STAR(R) approach to respond to each criterion.

The post Vacancy: Fishery Assistant, Edinburgh – closing date: 14 January 2020 appeared first on Marine Scotland.

Pages