Raster

Rockall and Helen's Reef - high resolution multibeam echosounder bathymetry

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

High resolution bathymetry data of Rockall and Helen's Reef collected 2011-2012 as part of the ROAME Offshore Fisheries and Conservation (OFFCON) project. Rockall, a tiny island just 19 metres high, sits on the very extremity of Scotland’s marine environment. Some 180 miles due west of St. Kilda, it is buffeted year round by the extreme winds and swell that the North Atlantic weather generates. As such, it is Scotland’s only truly offshore shallow water ecosystem. The islet of Rockall is actually the only part of vast plateau of submerged continent that remains above sea-level.

 

 

Fishing - Surface swept area ratio for UK vessels (≥15m) in 2012 - JNCC Report 515 - figure 1 (surface abrasion) (restricted zoom)

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

There are a growing number of human activities occurring within the marine environment. Concern over the possible impacts of these activities on the marine and coastal environment has led to the development of national, regional, and global commitments that aim to preserve, and, where possible, to mitigate impacts on marine environments (UKMMAS 2010).

 Different human activities exert a variety of pressures and these pressures will, in turn, have different levels of impact on habitats and species. To enable management of these impacts, we need to better understand how human activities and biodiversity interact spatially and temporally. We can then assess the sensitivity of the habitats and species that are exposed to these activities, and thus the associated pressures. When combined, exposure and sensitivity provide an indication of a habitat’s ‘vulnerability’ to impacts.

To support this vulnerability assessment approach, JNCC are developing methods for creating geospatial pressure datasets for use at a regional and national scale. These datasets are created using a GIS to delineate their spatial extent and all activities that are known to exert the pressure are considered. In the UK one of the priority pressures on benthic habitats is Physical Damage – “Habitat structure changes - abrasion & other physical damage” hereafter referred to as ‘abrasion’, which is described as the “disturbance of sediments where there is limited or no loss of substrate from the system”.

This layer depicts figure 1 - Surface swept area ratio for UK vessels (≥15m) in 2012 - from JNCC report 515 available via http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/page-7358

Fishing - Subsurface swept area ratio for UK vessels (≥15m) in 2012 - JNCC Report 515 - figure 2 (subsurface abrasion) (restricted zoom)

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

There are a growing number of human activities occurring within the marine environment. Concern over the possible impacts of these activities on the marine and coastal environment has led to the development of national, regional, and global commitments that aim to preserve, and, where possible, to mitigate impacts on marine environments (UKMMAS 2010).

 Different human activities exert a variety of pressures and these pressures will, in turn, have different levels of impact on habitats and species. To enable management of these impacts, we need to better understand how human activities and biodiversity interact spatially and temporally. We can then assess the sensitivity of the habitats and species that are exposed to these activities, and thus the associated pressures. When combined, exposure and sensitivity provide an indication of a habitat’s ‘vulnerability’ to impacts.

To support this vulnerability assessment approach, JNCC are developing methods for creating geospatial pressure datasets for use at a regional and national scale. These datasets are created using a GIS to delineate their spatial extent and all activities that are known to exert the pressure are considered. In the UK one of the priority pressures on benthic habitats is Physical Damage – “Habitat structure changes - abrasion & other physical damage” hereafter referred to as ‘abrasion’, which is described as the “disturbance of sediments where there is limited or no loss of substrate from the system”.

This layer depicts figure 2 - Subsurface swept area ratio for UK vessels (≥15m) in 2012 - from JNCC report 515 available via http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/page-7358

Other unclassified activities (restricted zoom)

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

In 2014, the Scottish Government commissioned Land Use Consultants to undertake a study to fill data gaps on marine recreation and tourism activity in Scotland and to provide baseline information for marine planning. The project was designed and undertaken with the industry and co-funded by the Scottish Government with additional contributions from The Firth of Clyde Forum, The Crown Estate and The Scottish Coastal Forum.  This layer depicts other unclassified activities.

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