WMS

National Nature Reserves (SNH WMS)

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

In 2004 there were 73 National Nature Reserves in Scotland, as per the list below. However, following a review of NNR policy that took account of the availability of other designations conferring legal protection, such as site of special scientific interest, special protection area and special area of conservation, Scottish Natural Heritage together with other reserve management organisations (sometimes referred to as 'approved bodies') started re-shaping the Scotland's National Nature Reserve series. This process continues today (2013). From late 2012, governance of the NNR designation in Scotland is through a partnership group, comprising representatives of existing reserve management organisations and community land groups, chaired by Scottish Natural Heritage. Scottish Natural Heritage is still responsible for the formal/ legal declaration of NNR. This particular dataset contains coastal sites only

Scotland Change 1970 Modern (view at 1:433,434 or better zoom) (SNH WMS)

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

The Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 requires the development of an Adaptation Programme to take forward the risks identified within the UK’s Climate Change Risk Assessment (UK-CCRA). The UK-CCRA anticipates increases in sea level, coastal erosion and coastal flooding to increasingly affect Scotland’s soft coastlines and the assets found on these coasts. Shoreline Management Plans have been produced for only short sections of the Scottish coast which limits the information available to coastal managers. Consequently a National Coastal Change Assessment (NCCA) has been commissioned by the Scottish Government and is supported by a number of agencies.

Coastal change data between 1970s and Modern data. The 1970s data is based on Mean High Water Spring, digitised from OS National Grid 1:10,560/1:10,000 sheets. Epoch 1956 to 1995. The Modern data is a composite of OS MasterMap MHWS data and updates from multiple surveys. Extent: Soft or Erodible shorelines. This data was analysed as part of ‘Dynamic Coast’ Scotland’s National Coastal Change Assessment, see www.dynamiccoast.com for more info.

This layer is part of a series of Scottish Natural Heritage Web Map Service (WMS) layers. The layers are best viewed at 1:433,434 or better as they are slow to draw.

Scotland MHWS Modern (view at 1:433,434 or better zoom) (SNH WMS)

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

The Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 requires the development of an Adaptation Programme to take forward the risks identified within the UK’s Climate Change Risk Assessment (UK-CCRA). The UK-CCRA anticipates increases in sea level, coastal erosion and coastal flooding to increasingly affect Scotland’s soft coastlines and the assets found on these coasts. Shoreline Management Plans have been produced for only short sections of the Scottish coast which limits the information available to coastal managers. Consequently a National Coastal Change Assessment (NCCA) has been commissioned by the Scottish Government and is supported by a number of agencies.

This layer shows Mean High Water Spring, selected from OS MasterMap dataset and amended with data from additional sources. Epoch 2001 to 2016. Extent: Soft or Erodible shorelines. Additional sources include MHWS line extracted from public sector LiDAR surveys etc, where these we’re more representative than the OS data. This data was produced as part of ‘Dynamic Coast’ Scotland’s National Coastal Change Assessment, see www.dynamiccoast.com for more info.

This layer is part of a series of Scottish Natural Heritage Web Map Service (WMS) layers. The layers are best viewed at 1:433,434 or better as they are slow to draw.

Scotland MHWS 1970 (view at 1:433,434 or better zoom) (SNH WMS)

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

The Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 requires the development of an Adaptation Programme to take forward the risks identified within the UK’s Climate Change Risk Assessment (UK-CCRA). The UK-CCRA anticipates increases in sea level, coastal erosion and coastal flooding to increasingly affect Scotland’s soft coastlines and the assets found on these coasts. Shoreline Management Plans have been produced for only short sections of the Scottish coast which limits the information available to coastal managers. Consequently a National Coastal Change Assessment (NCCA) has been commissioned by the Scottish Government and is supported by a number of agencies.

This layer shows Mean High Water Spring, digitised from OS National Grid 1:10,560/1:10,000 sheets. Epoch 1956 to 1995. Extent: Soft or Erodible shorelines. This data was digitised as part of ‘Dynamic Coast’ Scotland’s National Coastal Change Assessment, see www.dynamiccoast.com for more info.

This layer is part of a series of Scottish Natural Heritage Web Map Service (WMS) layers. The layers are best viewed at 1:433,434 or better as they are slow to draw.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - WMS