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Coastal settlement typology - Scotland 2016 - Peripheral fishing and port towns

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

The peripheral fishing and port towns layer consists of 53 coastal localities characterized as fishing and port towns with varying degrees of demographic change. This is characterized on the basis of their census based socio-economic and demographic characteristics. This is the second stage of a based on a two-stage cluster analysis of coastal localities (defined as within 2 kilometres of the coast) with populations of greater than 1000 (for reasons of confidentiality).

These places have been characterised with higher employment in fishing/water and construction than the coastal average. Part Time and Self-employment are above coastal average perhaps reflecting the artisan fishing and smaller fleets that occupy these harbour towns. This is consistent with skilled trade. There is evidence of deprivation with higher than coastal average scores at household level. The population is ageing with more ‘one person households’ than found elsewhere.

Localities around Inverness, the North‐West Highlands, and the Scottish island populations are growing but have socially homogenous populations. In contrast, stretches of the coast with traditional fishing localities have experienced overall population decline. Examples include the East Neuk of Fife and the Firth of Clyde.

Coastal settlement typology - Scotland 2016 - Military Families

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

The Military Families layer consists of two coastal localities with military bases.

This is characterized on the basis of their census based socio-economic and demographic characteristics. This is the second stage of a based on a two-stage cluster analysis of coastal localities (defined as within 2 kilometres of the coast) with populations of greater than 1000 (for reasons of confidentiality).

This cluster represents just 2 coastal localities which are dominated by defence employment. This is evidence of their proximity to military bases which is evident in commuting variables where they are highest in work within 10 kilometres. Full time employment is high with indicators relating to economically inactive as well as characterised as low for deprivation. Highest for Middle range qualifications (level 1+3) are expected here. Below average number of people employed in unskilled or manual jobs, with higher working aged between 16 and 44. There are high amounts of couples with children and private rented housing which would be in line with families employed in defence.  High proportions of ‘multi-households other’ which may reflect barrack accommodation.

Coastal settlement typology - Scotland 2016 - Linked later-life localities

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

The linked later-life localities layer consists of 53 coastal localities with an aging populaton. This is characterized on the basis of their census based socio-economic and demographic characteristics. This is the second stage of a based on a two-stage cluster analysis of coastal localities (defined as within 2 kilometres of the coast) with populations of greater than 1000 (for reasons of confidentiality).

The employment in these settlements is characterised by higher representation in information, communication, real estate, finance industries sectors and low levels of deprivation. There is a predominately older age profile in these settlements  over 45’s showing highest here with many couples with no children. There are high levels of owned housing and unpaid carers. There is highest car ownership in this cluster group.

 

Coastal settlement typology - Scotland 2016 - Industrial roots

Marine Scotland Information NMPi icon

The Industrial roots layer consists of 40 coastal localities characterized by industry. This is characterized on the basis of their census based socio-economic and demographic characteristics. This is the second stage of a based on a two-stage cluster analysis of coastal localities (defined as within 2 kilometres of the coast) with populations of greater than 1000 (for reasons of confidentiality).

The localities in this cluster show higher than coastal average for employment in manufacturing, retail, wholesale, transport and admin. It is above coastal average for all economically inactive variables.  This is coupled with highest deprivation, low qualification obtainment, and high levels of social rented housing. These populations are characterised by higher than average numbers of children (0-15), one parent families and poor health. This cluster however shows that these places are well served by infrastructure and public transport is the dominant means of commuting to work, with above coastal average for those working within 10km.

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